British Museum blog

Digging up – and preserving – the Iron Age

Alexandra Baldwin, British Museum

Alexandra Baldwin excavating the cauldrons

Five years ago I, and my colleague Simon Dove in the department of Conservation and Scientific Research at the British Museum, joined a team from Wessex Archaeology in a field in Wiltshire to excavate what we thought were three small bowls. Two weeks later, in baking sun and torrential rain, we had lifted 10 – or 12 – rather large cauldrons.

Brilliant! 10 Cauldrons! Being extremely rare, this was an exciting find.

One would have been fantastic. Three would have been amazing. But 10-12, on the other hand, was a huge challenge. First, we had to excavate them. Then we had to store them and finally conserve them so we can learn from them and perhaps even put them on display.

With such a huge find, and with the conservation project alone estimated to take two of us two years, Jody Joy, British Museum curator of Iron Age Britain, and I decided to apply for funding to study the cauldrons properly and conserve them so that we could understand their wider significance and give them the attention they deserve.

An illustration of how the cauldrons may have looked when first buried

Now we have the funding, work has started and over the next two years myself and a colleague, and Jody, along with scientists and other British Museum staff, will be unravelling the evidence of life in the Iron Age the cauldrons can provide us with.

In the coming months I’ll be writing regular posts – as will Jody, and my colleague in the conservation team Jamie Hood – documenting the journey through the project and describing what goes on behind the scenes at the British Museum, revealing discoveries as we find them… and not to mention the challenges we face.

The Chiseldon cauldrons research project is supported by the Leverhulme Trust

Find out more about this research project

If you would like to leave a comment click on the title

Filed under: Archaeology, Chiseldon cauldrons, Conservation, , , , , ,

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 13,130 other followers

Categories

Follow @britishmuseum on Twitter

British Museum on Instagram

Born #onthisday in 1360: the Yongle emperor of China. This beautiful blue-and-white moon flask was made during his reign
#China #art #porcelain #history Leonardo da Vinci died #onthisday in 1519. Here's his drawing of the Virgin and Child (& cat!) This drawing shows the seated Virgin holding the Christ Child on her right knee. The Child in turn grasps a cat which struggles to escape. The forms twist and turn within the space defined by the thin line of an arch. The moving figures form a triangle or pyramid, in a geometrical composition that is typical of Leonardo. At the top left of the sheet, the outline of a clock suggests that the sketch was a study for the Virgin and Child in a domestic setting.

This sheet shows how Leonardo rapidly developed his compositional ideas. First he drew the Virgin's head in the centre, tracing through the thin paper from a similar composition on the reverse of the sheet. Leonardo then placed the Virgin's head looking out to the left. Finally, he settled on the Virgin looking down to the right, to balance the heads of the Christ Child and the cat who face left. He then painted a thin brown wash over the final composition and strengthened his figures with thicker lines.

Leonardo made a number of drawings of this theme, but no painting of the Virgin and Child with Cat survives. Instead, the geometry and balance of the composition and sense of movement became characteristic of his High Renaissance style.
#art #history #drawing #Leonardo Born #onthisday in 1769: Duke of #Wellington Arthur Wellesley. He defeated #Napoleon at #Waterloo. In this satirical print from 1815 Wellington, with drawn sword, drives Napoleon before him, pointing out with extended forefinger the route his captive is to take.
Discover prints from the age of Napoleon and Wellington in our free exhibition #BonaparteAndTheBritish in Room 90.
#exhibition #free #BritishMuseum #propaganda #art May is named after the Greek goddess Maia. Here’s an allegorical print of the month by German artist Christian Bernhard Rode.
#May #months #art #history #print Happy #MayDay! Here’s Walter Crane’s 1874 design for a greeting card.
#May #art #drawing #history Don’t miss this beautiful community art installation in the Great Court until 6 May 2015, inspired by the art and culture of #IndigenousAustralia.
The Mary Ward Centre led this project, working with several groups in Camden and Islington.
#community #BritishMuseum #art #australia
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 13,130 other followers

%d bloggers like this: