British Museum blog

Back on site

Neal Spencer, British Museum

Surveying newly discovered graves in the post-New Kingdom cemetery

Following months of planning, preparation and travel it is always a relief to start work – but also rather unusual in that the initial days of excavation are very different from later in the season.

In the town, we must first remove deep layers of sand that have accumulated in the houses we partly excavated last year. There are no finds or pottery in these deposits so there is little recording and a fair bit of waiting before we reach real archaeology.

Clay floor revealed in the middle room of a small Ramesside house, about 1150BC

In two of the small houses, we are already down on earlier clean clay floors, with the remnants of a cooking hearth in the middle room of each house. It is likely that further occupation phases lie beneath.

A trench inside the southwestern corner of the wall is proving a little frustrating. Here, the buildings have been badly damaged by digging for clay, so there are deep pits filled with clean sand.

Looking for the southwestern town beneath thick layers of sand

Only a few fragments of walls have appeared so far, despite over 20 men and six wheelbarrows working seven hours a day to remove the sand! Sandbags are needed to keep up the trench sides.

In cemetery C, the team has revealed a number of small graves with niches for burials, but thus far all have been robbed, with only jumbled skeletal remains and fragments of pottery remaining. The robbers missed one nice object in Grave 220 – a faience scaraboid with a representation of Thoth as a baboon in place of the usual beetle form.

Faience scaraboid (F9312) with representation of Thoth, from Grave 221.

Another reason that the start of the season is unusual is that the daily rhythm has yet to crystalise – many of us are still setting up systems for later in the season (including a new electricity supply!), ordering and obtaining equipment from the town of Abri, while also trying to integrate new workmen into our digging system – we’ve hired 38 men this season.

If you would like to leave a comment click on the title

Filed under: Amara West, Archaeology, , , , , , ,

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 12,399 other followers

Categories

Follow @britishmuseum on Twitter

British Museum on Instagram

For #AprilFools today, here are some interesting (and true!) stories about the Museum. 
Did you know there was a merman (actually part monkey, part fish!) on display in the Enlightenment Gallery (Room 1)? This ‘merman’ was donated by HRH Prince Arthur of Connaught (1883–1938), grandson of Queen Victoria, and was said to have been 'caught' in Japan during the 18th century. It was given to Prince Arthur by an individual named Arisue Seijiro. 
The British Museum’s ‘merman’ is displayed in the Enlightenment Gallery as an example of the kind of ‘curiosity' that was found in early collections before the more encyclopaedic and reasoned approach to collecting that evolved through the 1700s. In this context it helps to show how museums changed during the 18th century from cabinets of curiosity to the type of museums we are more familiar with today.
#merman #mermaid For #AprilFools today, here are some interesting (and true!) stories about the Museum. 
This is Mike the cat, who assisted in keeping the Main Gate at the British Museum from Feb 1909 to Jan 1929. When he died, the former Keeper of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities, Sir E A Wallis Budge, wrote a whole pamphlet about him. His obituary was featured in both the London Evening Standard and Time magazine! Find out more about Mike the cat at britishmuseum.tumblr.com
#cat #Museum #AprilFools! April actually derives from the Latin word aperire, meaning to open (i.e. spring).
Here's #April at Kew Gardens, part of a series by Thomas Robert Way.
#spring #print #AprilFoolsDay #April is named after Aprillis, the Roman goddess of mischief The Eiffel Tower officially opened ‪#‎onthisday in 1889.
This 1928 print by French artist Jean Émile Laboureur depicts the Gardens of Trocadéro with the Eiffel Tower beyond.
#EiffelTower #Paris #print #art #history We are excited to announce that our exhibition #8mummies is now extended until 12 July 2015! Here are the 8 mummies you'll encounter in this groundbreaking exhibition #MummyMonday
#history #exhibition #mummy
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 12,399 other followers

%d bloggers like this: