British Museum blog

A charred seed…

Alexandra Baldwin, British Museum

Conservator, Jamie Hood working on one of the cauldrons

The two Chiseldon cauldrons we chose to work on first were found next to each other in the pit and had corroded together.

My colleague Jamie Hood has been given the first cauldron to be removed from the ground during excavation to work on.

Although it appeared to be in one piece in the ground, it was heavily corroded with large cracks hidden by the mud and soil. It was impossible to lift whole, so was removed in four large chunks surrounded by soil. The fact that it is in pieces actually makes it better for Jamie to work on as it is easier to move, handle, and support, and also fits under a microscope.

When he first started work within a few minutes I heard: ‘WOW, look at this, a charred seed!’ from the other side of the room.

My cauldron was probably the last one placed in the pit thousands of years ago. This meant that it was resting on top of the others and was therefore the one first discovered by the metal detectorist in 2004.

Of all the cauldrons, it is in the worst condition – a chunk lifted in plaster bandages and a lot of small pieces of corroded metal. But, it might also be the most interesting.

Some small fragments of the copper alloy already cleaned have decorative scalloped edges, or, apparently, as decorative as it gets for cauldrons in the late Iron Age.

As yet we don’t know much more about this cauldron and wont until I excavate it from its soil block. However, due to its highly fragmentary condition it will not be possible to physically reconstruct it.

Instead I will try and concentrate on a virtual, or at least an intellectual reconstruction, trying to gain as much information from the fragments as possible.

A piece of one of the cauldrons

The most important areas are the rim, handles and decorative patches, and if we can relocate these and examine how they were constructed then this will tell us a great deal about the cauldron.

To make things more complicated some of Jamie’s cauldron was corroded to and lifted with mine. Trying to decide which fragments of 0.5mm metal belong to which cauldron will be very difficult and the whole process will need very careful excavation and detailed recording.

The Chiseldon cauldrons research project is supported by the Leverhulme Trust

Find out more about this research project

If you would like to leave a comment click on the title

Filed under: Archaeology, Chiseldon cauldrons, Conservation, , , ,

One Response - Comments are closed.

  1. Austin says:

    Great post, I look forward to posts by you.

    Like

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 11,522 other followers

Categories

Follow @britishmuseum on Twitter

British Museum on Instagram

Born #onthisday in 58 BC: Livia Drusilla (Julia Augusta), wife of Augustus, mother of Tiberius
#history Charlemagne died #onthisday in 814. Very few of his surviving coins carry the imperial title – this gold solidus from the port of Dorestad describes him as king of the Franks and the Lombards
#history #coins #Charlemagne 'We are all fools in love' – Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice was first published #onthisday in 1813.  Here's a wood-engraved illustration by Helen Binyon from 1938
#illustration #JaneAusten #books #history English artist Samuel Palmer was born #onthisday in 1805. He made this painting late in his career, when his critical reputation was higher than it had ever been. It is a representation of late evening: quiet and meditative, even idyllic. The sun has already set, leaving a purplish glow in the sky; the moon and the evening star can be seen in the clear sky above. There is a sense of the chill of early autumn in the colours. Dark-coloured birds, probably rooks, are circling in the sky above the castle on the river, while a single white bird flies across the river.
London, about 1878.
#history #art #watercolour #painting Born #onthisday in 1832: Lewis Carroll, author of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. This illustration from the final chapter shows Alice upsetting the twelve creatures of the jury 
#history #illustration #AliceinWonderland #books Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born #onthisday in 1756. Here he is, aged 8, not long before the Mozart family arrived in London in 1764
#mozart #music #history
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 11,522 other followers

%d bloggers like this: