British Museum blog

Afghanistan Now: Photographs by Fardin Waezi

Constance Wyndham, Assistant Exhibition Curator

Last week we installed Afghanistan Now: Photographs by Fardin Waezi, a display of photographs by this talented Afghan photographer, in the Clore Foyers underneath the Great Court in the British Museum. This display is part of a wider programme of events surrounding the exhibition Afghanistan: Crossroads of the Ancient World.

Fardin’s images reveal many sides of life in Afghanistan that are rarely seen, from an all girl football team to a fishmonger showing off his catch in the market. Photography is the most developed of the visual arts in Afghanistan. The relentless spotlight of the media on Afghanistan has created great opportunities for photographers and film makers to publish their work internationally. Afghan photographers often have the best access to people and news stories, and can travel anonymously. This constant demand for pictures of a country in transition has meant that photography and film have both flourished there since 2001.

A fishmonger, Ahmed Satar, displays his wares to attract customers in Kote Sangi district, Kabul, 2010 © Fardin Waezi

Fardin took his first photograph in his father’s studio in Kabul when he was seven years old. His father used a traditional box camera to photograph people in the street, and under the Taliban Fardin worked with him as a street photographer. During this time, the photography of people was banned and as a keen photographer, Fardin was arrested several times for ‘photography related crimes’. After the fall of the Taliban in 2001, Fardin joined the newly established AINA (Afghan Media and Culture Centre) in Kabul and studied photojournalism. Since then, his work has been published internationally by Der Spiegel, Le Point, Le Nouvel Observateur, Le Figaro, The New York Times, Le Monde, Associated Press and CNN. Fardin runs photojournalism courses for the next generation of Afghan photographers at AINA and he is currently the official photographer for UNAMA (United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan).

The Jangalak industrial complex was known as one of the country's largest factories until the civil war tore it apart. Today, due to lack of public space in Kabul, children play here are school and students study among the ruins. Kabul 2010. © Fardin Waezi

Creating an independent media is an important part of the reconstruction effort in Afghanistan. Reza Deghati, an Iranian photographer, set up a photojournalism department in 2001 for the newly established AINA (Afghan Media and Culture Centre) in Kabul. AINA provides training for young Afghan photographers who are now gaining reputations as some of Afghanistan’s best photographers, including Fardin Waezi, Wakil Kohsar, Farzana Wahidy, Massoud Hosseini, and Gulbuddin Elham.

Many internationally renowned photographers and photojournalists who have visited Afghanistan have run workshops and training programmes for the country’s aspiring photographers. In 2010, British photographer Simon Norfolk ran workshops in Kabul for Fardin Waezi and other photographers. Their work was shown in Views of Kabul (6 – 28 March, 2011) an exhibition of photography at the Queen’s Palace, Bagh e Babur, Kabul.

Afghanistan Now: Photographs by Fardin Waezi is on display until 10 June 2011 and is part of the World Collections Programme which aims to establish partnerships across the world and increase access to the UK collections and expertise.

Filed under: Afghanistan: Crossroads of the Ancient World, Exhibitions

3 Responses - Comments are closed.

  1. Dear all who take care of such artists from 3.world,

    it is a good work, wishig him more success, and wishing myself getting such a chance to exibit my photographers from palestinien refugeecamps in libanon, syria and…some photographers are on my website.
    with best regards
    mahmoud dabdoub

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  2. margaret collins says:

    Much more interested in the fish (Zoastrian influences perhaps) and the horn goblet and Roman bowl with ridges. Shame no postcards of these.
    Does anyone have the wording of the philosopher’s statement in the Greek city ? Exhibition so crowded no time or space to stand and stare or take notes. Personally more interested in the daily life items ( why no details of the mirrors in the graves found?) than in the ivories or gold.

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  3. Julia Sandison says:

    Visited the exhibition this morning – a Tuesday – and was lucky enough to find it not too crowded. However as so often happens at the BM, the shop and its related products proved a real disappointment: there were only 5 or possibly 6 postcards and nearly all of gold items whereas I’d lost my heart to the delicate glass bowl with handles and the beautiful ceremonial plate depicting Cybele the Greek goddess of nature. I frequently find that the BM has failed to recognise that gold is not everyone’s choice. Fortunately the catalogue had been reduced from £25 (a price I cannot afford) to £15 ( a price I can just about manage as I’m a pensioner). However all that aside (and I KNOW the BM will continue to disappoint in this area), the exhibition was well worth the cost of the train fare to London and the entry, though the catalogue – spectacular – will leave me short on food this week!

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