British Museum blog

Making a new Money gallery at the British Museum

Catherine Eagleton, British Museum

Chinese Ming banknote, AD 1375

Chinese Ming banknote, AD 1375

The Money gallery at the British Museum opened 14 years ago, and was at the time a new way of displaying coins and medals. It represented a new way of thinking about the history of money, and changed the way museums around the world told this global story.

Now, a new partnership between Citi and the British Museum means we are able to redisplay the gallery, make changes to the design and content of the displays, and take advantage of new knowledge and new ideas in museology and monetary history.

We will be building on the results of an evaluation of the current Money gallery that has been done over the past few years. This gives us some clear pointers for how it can be clarified and updated, and we have already started a programme of consultation with key audiences to find out what they would like to see the new gallery containing, and what questions they have about money and its history.

Penny defaced by suffragettes, AD 1903. Crown copyright

Penny defaced by suffragettes, AD 1903. Crown copyright

The gallery will use money as a lens through which to look at the history of the world, as well as showing the different forms and functions money has taken and had around the world in the last 3,000 years or so. The challenge for me as the lead curator on the project is to work out how to edit a complex global story down so that it can be told in a single room. But here I am lucky to be able to draw on the expertise of my subject-specialist colleagues.

Gold coin of Abd al-Malik, probably made in Syria, AH 77 / AD 696-7

Gold coin of Abd al-Malik, probably made in Syria, AH 77 / AD 696-7

Throughout the coming year, members of the project team will be tracking the progress of this exciting project, here on the blog, right up to the opening in June 2012.

I’ll post something about once a month and, in between, there will be contributions from other people on how the project looks from their point of view.

We will be writing about (among other things) evaluation, object selection, text writing, design, conservation, and the tricky business of how you remove thousands of small objects from display and keep track of where they all are while the gallery works are in progress in the first few months of 2012.

The Money Gallery project is supported by Citi and opens in June 2012.

Filed under: Collection, Money Gallery, , , , ,

2 Responses - Comments are closed.

  1. RichardE says:

    I really like your idea of looking at history through money.

    Like

  2. Glyn says:

    I like this idea – will keep track of what is happening

    Like

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 11,817 other followers

Categories

Follow @britishmuseum on Twitter

British Museum on Instagram

You can now explore #AfricanRockArt from #Chad with new images available online at www.britishmuseum.org/africanrockart 
Chad has thousands of rock art engravings and paintings, some up to 7,000 years old! 
Throughout the caves, canyons and shelters of the Ennedi Plateau in Chad, thousands of images have been painted and engraved, comprising one of the biggest collections of rock art in the Sahara. A series of engravings at Niola Doa of groups of life-sized human figures have become especially renowned for their singularity and quality.
#art #rockart #Africa #Chad #engraving #painting This week we’re highlighting the #AfricanRockArt project, cataloguing 30,000 years of rock art.
Did you know that some rock art in #Niger is thought to be several thousand years old? Find out more about the rock art in Niger with new images online at www.britishmuseum.org/africanrockart
These spectacular life-size engravings of giraffe can be found at Dabous in Niger. Thought to date from between 6,000 and 8,000 years ago, the engravings cannot be seen from ground level and are only visible by climbing onto the boulder.
#RockArt #Africa #giraffe #art #history Here’s an exquisite chalk drawing by Renoir, born #onthisday in 1841.

Renoir began his career as a painter of porcelain in Limoges, aged thirteen, before studying with Sisley and Monet at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. His early work flitted between sober academic painting and freer, more colourful en plein air ('open-air') work. He was, with Monet, at the forefront of the movement that became known as Impressionism. The two artists painted side-by-side on occasion, most famously for their paintings of the popular bathing-spot La Grenouillère (1869), then just outside Paris on the banks of the Seine.

His later works concentrate on the female nude and he tended to emphasize simple forms and solidity, as well as relishing pink and orange flesh, as this study illustrates. Several versions of this pose survive, all probably intended as finished pieces rather than sketches for grander work.

Crippled by rheumatism in his last years, Renoir continued to paint with brushes jammed between his fingers. 'If painting were not a pleasure to me I should certainly not do it'.
#art #artist #Renoir #impressionism #history #drawing Charles Le Brun, who painted many of the ceilings at #Versailles, was born #onthisday in 1619. Here's one of his studies for a section of ceiling in the Galerie des Glaces at Versailles.
#art #drawing #history George Frederick Handel was born #onthisday in 1685. Here’s a portrait of the Baroque composer by British artist Richard Phelps
#history #music #composer Watching the #Oscars2015? You too can be inspired by Greek art in #DefiningBeauty @TheAcademy
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 11,817 other followers

%d bloggers like this: