British Museum blog

Special teddy appeal – Grayson Perry exhibition

Turner Prize winning artist Grayson Perry has spent the past two years behind the scenes at the British Museum putting together The Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman. This major exhibition, opening in October, is an installation of his new works alongside objects made by unknown men and women throughout history from the British Museum’s collection. Watch Grayson’s video introduction here:

Now finalising the objects, Grayson is looking for three brave ‘stunt doubles’ of Alan Measles, his childhood teddy bear (and god of his imaginary world) to be part of the exhibition. The chosen bears will sit for just over one month each in the teddy shrine on the back of his specially commissioned motorbike on display in the Museum’s Great Court. Can you help? Here, Grayson explains all:

If your teddy has what it takes to be a stunt double, enter the competition here

Grayson Perry: The Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman
is supported by AlixPartners,
with Louis Vuitton.

Filed under: Exhibitions, Grayson Perry: The Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman

2 Responses - Comments are closed.

  1. bambooravi says:

    Hi,
    I just been here while searching about Indian history on “mohenjo daro harappa” 4000-year old cities. I got a lot of information and knowledge while going through various posts here in this blog. I tried to click the competition link above but I think that either not working or some problem from my side. I will try later. Thanks for the best posts here in britishmuseum.org.
    Rawat

    Like

  2. Ken Hawes says:

    Amazing !! I want to know more ….thankyou,

    Like

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