British Museum blog

The British Museum has created a Semantic Web Endpoint


Dominic Oldman, IS Development Manager, British Museum

This month the British Museum launched a service known as a Semantic Endpoint that will allow more direct online access to the collection database. Although it is a technical service it will support the creation of new web applications and services accessible to many different audiences.

What is a Semantic Endpoint?

Since 2007, visitors to the British Museum website have been able to search the collection through regular web pages. The Collection Online system has nearly two million objects and is still growing but provides only one way of viewing the information.

Rosetta Stone, from Egypt, 196 BC

Rosetta Stone, from Egypt, 196 BC

So, although people can search the collection using our website, the search interface cannot really meet the needs of all the many different audiences that might use it. The Endpoint allows external IT developers to create their own applications that satisfy particular requirements, and these can be built into other websites and use the Museum’s data in real time – so it never goes out of date.

Why have we done this?

The demand for new digital services and products increases as the Internet grows. Research projects require particular datasets; aggregation projects need data to help make cultural assets more accessible to larger audiences; educational software requires access to up-to-date knowledge, and so on.

Digital services on the Web can only fully develop if the information that underpins them is more freely available. If more organisations release data using the same open standards then more effort can go into creative and innovative uses for it rather than into laborious data collection and cleaning.

Why is it a ‘Semantic Web’ Endpoint?

The Museum’s Endpoint specifically uses a global open standard technology for data storage and retrieval – the Semantic format. This means that developers can potentially bring together data from different cultural organisations (if they adopt the open standard) using a common language, and use it, for example, to study and compare all drawings by the artist Rembrandt held in one, two, three or however many museums and galleries.

The result is applications that are more sustainable and robust, and this means that developers can provide general open source tools that can be downloaded and used by anyone for free.

Also, the ‘semantic’ element of the technology means that it is structured in such a way that allows the discovery of connections and relationship between data from different sources that would be difficult, if not impossible, to discover with traditional technologies. With this, we can improve our understanding and knowledge of objects and events even further.

You can find more information and the endpoint itself on the British Museum website.

If you would like to leave a comment click on the title

Filed under: Collection, , , , ,

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 9,410 other followers

Categories

Follow @britishmuseum on Twitter

British Museum on Instagram

King of Persia Cyrus the Great entered #Babylon #onthisday in 539 BC. This iconic clay cylinder, known as the Cyrus Cylinder, is inscribed in Babylonian cuneiform with an account by Cyrus of his conquest of Babylon in 539 BC and the capture of Nabonidus, the last Babylonian king. 
The cylinder has sometimes been described as the 'first charter of human rights', as it describes measures of relief Cyrus brought to the inhabitants of the city after its capture. However it in fact reflects a long tradition in Mesopotamia where, from as early as the third millennium BC, kings began their reigns with declarations of reforms. 
#history #art Experience the pleasures of the early Ming court in an evening of performance, demonstrations, talks and workshops on Friday 14 November. Free, just drop in #Ming50Years 
#event #free #china #art #onthisday in 1420: Beijing is officially designated the principal capital of the #Ming empire. Find out more about the Forbidden City and this beautiful hanging scroll in a new tumblr post at britishmuseum.tumblr.com #Ming50Years
#China #art #history #Beijing This half-term is the perfect time to visit our groundbreaking exhibition #8mummies! Kids under 16 go free and families can pick up a free family trail #MummyMonday 
#mummy #halfterm #holidays #family Athelstan, the first King of England, died #onthisday in 939. This silver coin was minted in York
#coin #history #England Artist Mary Moser was born #onthisday in 1744. In 1768 she was one of only two female founding members of the @royalacademyofarts (the other being Angelica Kauffman). Here's one of her watercolours
#history #art #watercolour
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 9,410 other followers

%d bloggers like this: