British Museum blog

Digging Domuztepe: Weeks three and four – tantalising glimpses of the past

Alexandra Fletcher and Rachel Swift are a curator and a conservator working at Domuztepe, a Late Neolithic site (about 6200-5500 BC) in south eastern Turkey. This series of posts traces the weekly progress of their recent excavation season.


Alexandra Fletcher, British Museum

Shopping in the Gaziantep souk

Shopping in the Gaziantep souk

We all returned from a weekend break refreshed and then a couple of days later Rachel had to return to London. As she left, we were joined by Ben Gearey, an environmental archaeologist from the University of Birmingham.

Ben is here to take sediment samples from the floodplain surrounding Domuztepe, which he will examine for pollen, beetle remains and shells in order to try and reconstruct the ancient landscape.

Ben examining the floodplain sediments

Ben examining the floodplain sediments

Getting the samples out of the ground could be done by drilling out vertical cores by hand, but in the dry clay soils this proved very difficult. So we decided to dig very deep holes with a large JCB. Meanwhile, the excavation of the Neolithic well has been making steady progress.

The view down the Neolithic well

The view down the Neolithic well

Stuart Campbell, the dig director, has been working to excavate this feature. He has now removed over six metres of soil and each one has to be laboriously hauled up to the surface. He has to put on a safety harness and a helmet before climbing down a rope ladder to begin digging.

Dig director, Stuart gets his safety harness on

Dig director, Stuart gets his safety harness on

Despite being difficult to use on the floodplain , the coring equipment proved very useful in looking at the soils in the bottom of the well and finding out how much more there is to dig (about 1.5 metres). Much to Stuart’s relief we should get through that before we have to stop digging altogether.

Lowering the heavy metal coring equipment down into the well with Stuart at the bottom was difficult and had to be done very carefully indeed.

As the well walls have to be cut back and held in place with wood panels it has also allowed us to see layers of the site that it would take us years to reach with normal excavation. Tantalising bits of Neolithic pottery have been coming out with the soil and we have been able to see periods of building, abandonment and even large scale burning within the settlement.

If you would like to leave a comment click on the title

Filed under: Archaeology, Domuztepe dig 2011

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 11,508 other followers

Categories

Follow @britishmuseum on Twitter

British Museum on Instagram

Robert Burns was born #onthisday in 1759. Will you be addressing a haggis this #BurnsNight? Born #onthisday in AD 76: Roman emperor Hadrian. This marble bust was found near Tivoli, outside Rome
#history #sculpture Edouard Manet, sometimes called the first Modernist and last Old Master, was born #onthisday in 1832. 
This print, Les Courses ('The Races'), shows Manet's drawing at its most vigorous. The viewpoint is dramatic; the observer is placed in the centre of the racetrack awaiting the horses' imminent stampede. The railing slopes away at an unnerving angle. The lower right-hand corner dissolves into furious scribbling, with the lithographic crayon used on its side as well as its point.

Manet was a keen racegoer, often attending with his fellow artist Degas, whom he met while Degas was copying Velazquez' Infanta Maria Margarita in the @museelouvre 
#artist #Manet #history The exhibition #IndigenousAustralia will celebrate the cultural strength and resilience of both Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders, exploring the remarkable story of how an ancient civilisation has endured and whose story is still unfolding today. This spectacular turtle-shell mask is from the Torres Strait Islands and is used in ceremonies. 
Tickets are now on sale for #IndigenousAustralia – our new major exhibition opening 23 April britishmuseum.org/indigenousaustralia We're delighted to announce a new special exhibition: #IndigenousAustralia. Opening 23 April, this will be the first major exhibition in the UK to present a history of Indigenous Australia, drawing on remarkable objects to highlight 60,000 years of continuous culture
#exhibition This object will feature in our next major exhibition, to be announced tomorrow! Can you guess where it is from?
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 11,508 other followers

%d bloggers like this: