British Museum blog

The Big Draw: why drawing matters


Hilary Williams, Art History Education Officer, British Museum

The act of drawing makes someone really look. Drawing heightens curiosity, one of the concepts on which the Museum was founded way back in 1753 when it aimed to attract the “interested and curious”. While drawing, you are almost asking yourself, how was this made, how did that craftsman or artist form this object, mould it, carve it, colour it and use it?

Drawing objects is part of a journey. A journey asking these questions but also discovering something about yourself, as you look, perceive, question and discover. As Picasso said so eloquently, “I do not seek, I find”.

The Big Draw will take place at the British Museum on Saturday 8 October 2011 and encourages participants to spend 20 to 30 minutes or more really looking at objects through drawing them.

This is our twelfth Big Draw and we’ve taken the theme from the forthcoming exhibition Grayson Perry: The Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman. That theme is the Teddy Bears Picnic and is inspired by Grayson’s use of Alan Measles, his teddy bear and god of his world of creativity, and should appeal to families or children of all ages, from three to 93… Teddies will be posed with the British Museum objects which have inspired Grayson in his choice of objects included in his new exhibition.

Why do I think the Big Draw is important? Drawing can be part of the creative exercise, creating another world for thoughts, dreams, objects or whatever. Drawing can also communicate that creativity. It can be a means of showing your imagination to someone else; what a sublime experience!

Grayson Perry is a marvellous example of this. He uses drawing to create imaginary worlds and a new context for thoughts or, in the exhibition at the British Museum, for objects. We are incredibly lucky that Grayson is coming to discuss why and how he draws, on Big Draw day, at 14.00.

To see the Big Draw in action is inspiring and a real thrill. It’s great to see people of all ages and backgrounds, drawing together, literally and metaphorically, across generations and cultures, without language being a barrier. Everyone can draw!

Come on a journey to draw and find curious new worlds, in front of your eyes and in your imagination!

If you would like to leave a comment click on the title

The Big Draw: the teddy bears’ picnic takes place at the British Museum on Saturday 8 October, 11.00–16.00. The full programme is available online. Children and teddy bears must be accompanied by an adult at all times.

Grayson Perry: The Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman
is supported by AlixPartners, with Louis Vuitton.
Book tickets now

Filed under: Exhibitions, Grayson Perry: The Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman, , , ,

6 Responses - Comments are closed.

  1. Rahul says:

    Drawing is an immese relief for the artists…you can actually see something tangible…

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  2. Mrs Gwynedd Sooke says:

    On behalf of Gwynedd Sooke, who wrote her thoughts for the blog after attending Grayson Perry’s lecture during The Big Draw-

    Grayson Perry’s talk was received enthusiastically. One could see why. He has an endearing personality, plays down his gifts, is open and honest about his opinions and beliefs and his journey as an artist…….. Perhaps, he was right in not presuming to demonstrate or instruct, rather to show as he did the results of his own observation and perception. I am sure that the audience would view his current exhibition with fresh eyes as a result of this contact with him.

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    • Thanks for your thoughts. Yes, it was marvellous that Grayson gave us a sense of why he draws, as part of a long creative process, a sort of “thinking through” of ideas and then transmitting those thoughts from 2D to 3D gave a wonderful window onto his creative world.

      Hilary Williams, British Museum

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  3. annette milnes says:

    Grayson Perry’s exhibition, which I visited yesterday, was one of the most amazing exhibitions I have ever seen. The pots were probably my favourite items on display but the tapestries were wonderful too. His use of colour is amazing and I have always loved yellow and blue together. Each item by Grayson Perry looked to have so much intricacy in them. The other items in the exhibition which had been chosen by GP contrasted perfectly with his own work. The coffin containing GP’s ponytail was very clever and immediately reminded me of ancient Egypt’s approach to death. My son, who came with, me can easily visit again as he lives in Bloomsbury, but I live near Oxford so it is not so easy… but I do have a copy of the catalogue to remind myself of a magical visit.

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    • Hilary Williams says:

      Thank you for your comments and feedback on the exhibition. Yellow and blue juxtaposed always seem to work so well, in Vermeer, Van Gogh and Grayson Perry. In a lecture on Big Draw Day, Grayson made a wonderful comment on colour, in response a young boy’s question, “What is your favourite colour?” Grayson said he did not have one because the effect of colour changes depending on which other colour is next to it. A great answer, whether the listener is 8 or 88.

      Hilary Williams, British Museum

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This is Room 69, Greek and Roman life. It's the next gallery space in our #MuseumOfTheFuture series.
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