British Museum blog

Digging Domuztepe: week five – clearing up, packing away

Alexandra Fletcher and Rachel Swift are a curator and a conservator working at Domuztepe, a Late Neolithic site (about 6200-5500 BC) in south eastern Turkey. This series of posts traces the weekly progress of their recent excavation season.


Alexandra Fletcher, British Museum

My last week in camp starts badly as our water supply fails. Apparently there were problems at the local pumping station. Ever adaptable, the team takes the soil sampling tins and some empty drinking water bottles to collect water from the local spring so at least we can flush our toilets.

Stuart emerges from the Neolithic well for the last time

Stuart emerges from the Neolithic well for the last time

The last week is always hectic and this year is no exception. We finish work on site on the last day before the holiday to mark the end of Ramadan. Much to everyone’s relief we manage to finish digging out the well and sort out the relationships between all the Neolithic mud walls we have found. Then, as a three day holiday starts for everyone else in Turkey, we begin the long process of packing everything ready to go into the local museum. It all needs to be cleaned and recorded before being packed away.

Time to pack things into the store at the museum

Time to pack things into the store at the museum

The work is incredibly varied. One minute you are brushing the soil from skeletons, the next labelling tiny beads and the next washing pottery. Then suddenly it’s the night before I am due to leave and I am frantically packing my own things into bags.

As my plane leaves the local airport the next day I have mixed feelings; glad to be going home but sad that the digging is over for another year.

As ever the team owes much thanks to the local residents of Kelibişler, Kadioğlu Çiftliği and Emiroğlu and all our other supporters in Kahramanmaraş and Pazarcik, especially the staff of Kahramanmaraş Museum.

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Filed under: Archaeology, Domuztepe dig 2011

One Response - Comments are closed.

  1. reindeer00 says:

    Well done, hard working archaeologists, looking forward to reading more. Best wishes to you.

    Like

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