British Museum blog

Digging Domuztepe: back in the UK

Alexandra Fletcher and Rachel Swift are a curator and a conservator working at Domuztepe, a Late Neolithic site (about 6200-5500 BC) in south eastern Turkey. This series of posts traces the progress of their recent excavation season.


Alexandra Fletcher, British Museum

I always arrive home to a weird feeling of disorientation. After being away for so long it takes a few days to adjust back to luxuries such as hot water on tap and comfy chairs to sit on. My surroundings also look shockingly green after the dry, baked fields of south eastern Turkey.

A view of the village on our last morning

A view of the village on our last morning

After the excitement of getting home has faded, it’s back to work for the Domuztepe team. Although the dig only happens for a few weeks every year, the project is running all the time with people analysing the data collected, writing up the results, updating our databases and digitising field records, plans or drawings. As soon as we arrive home we also begin our permit and funding applications for next year’s dig. The excavation is therefore a year-round activity and the site is never far from my mind.

The Domuztepe project was supported by the British Institute at Ankara, the British Museum, University of Manchester, Brennan foundation and the Gerald Averay Wainwright fund for the 2011 season.

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Filed under: Archaeology, Domuztepe dig 2011

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