British Museum blog

Amara West 2012: a stela from house E13.6


Marie Vandenbeusch, University of Geneva and Elisabeth Greifenstein, University of Würzburg

While excavating the front room of house E13.6 at Amara West, archaeologist Mary Shepperson came across a stone lying next to a grindstone. At first it appeared to be a similar object, but upon further inspection it proved to have carved decoration on one face.

Stela F5808 found in room E 13.6.1

Stela F5808 found in room E 13.6.1

This sandstone stela (F5808), 17.4 cm in height, depicts a woman on the right side making an offering of a flower to a seated figure wearing a crown on the left side. As with all finds, this was carefully labelled and brought to the dig house at the end of the day, where they are registered on our database by Marie, and later drawn by Elisabeth.

Even after some days have passed, we (as Egyptologists) are unsure if the figure on the left is wearing the red crown or the double crown, because in different kinds of light the carvings in the eroded areas can be very unclear.

Stela, British Museum EA 68675, from Amara West

Stela, British Museum EA 68675, from Amara West

But the person shown, who might be a king, is holding a long sceptre in his left hand. Comparing this stela with one previously found in Amara West and now in the British Museum (shown here), it might be possible that the names of a king and goddess were written above the head of the figures.

Further study, and especially the process of drawing the stela under different light, might reveal who is depicted. In any case, it is a stela of rather humble quality. Though found in a house, we cannot be sure it was originally set up here, as stelae can be recycled as lids for storage vessels, to construct staircases, or anything else that requires pieces of stone.

 


 

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A Japanese woodblock print of a snow scene from today's #BMAdventCalendar This is the next space in our #MuseumOfTheFuture series looking at all the galleries in the Museum. Rooms 92–94 are the Mitsubishi Corporation Japanese Galleries. Continuity and change have shaped Japanese material culture since ancient times. Through extensive cultural exchange, Japan has become a thriving modern, high-technology society while continuing to celebrate many elements of its traditional culture.
You can explore the art, religion, entertainment and everyday life of emperors, courtiers and townspeople in Rooms 92–94 through objects dating from ancient Japan to the modern period.
Artefacts range from porcelain and Samurai warrior swords, to woodblock prints and 20th-century manga comic books.
Historic tea ceremony wares can also be seen, alongside a reconstruction of a traditional tea house. Today’s #BMAdventCalendar – this struck bronze medal shows a nativity scene Four boys make a snowball in this Japanese woodblock print from today’s #BMAdventCalendar Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb, set and filmed here, is now in cinemas across the UK! #NightAtTheMuseum This is Room 91, the next gallery in our #MuseumOfTheFuture series. It's used for temporary exhibitions, usually from the Department of Asia. At the moment you can see the exhibition Pilgrims, healers and wizards: Buddhism and religious practices in Burma and Thailand (until 11 January 2015).
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