British Museum blog

Amara West 2012: wind stops play


Neal Spencer, British Museum

‘Wednesday February 1st. Before breakfast, a mighty wind arose ….’

Ancient houses, and our sieves - all that remained on site after wind forced us to stop work

Ancient houses, and our sieves - all that remained on site after wind forced us to stop work

This excerpt from Mary Shepperson’s excavation diary only hints at the howling northerly wind that forced us to stop work on site at 11.00am yesterday. Besides reducing visibility, sand was pouring into rooms as we excavated them, and recording was impossible due to flapping tapes and the sail-like properties of drawing boards.

We stopped work, huddled by the river awaiting our boat, and during the ride home could not see the other bank of the Nile.

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Find out more about the Amara West research project

Filed under: Amara West, Archaeology,

3 Responses - Comments are closed.

  1. Enzo says:

    Magic…..i know it’s no good for our kind of job, but i love Africa, and Sudan, even during these events…

    Like

  2. Rebecca says:

    I hope it doesn’t set you back too much and you are able to get back to work quick smart. Good luck- maybe pour some libations to Aeolos for good measure.

    Like

  3. Gisele BUSSON says:

    I visited the Amara site on 2nd February. Our guide was Murtada (Sudanese archeologist Director of Napata Museum in Jebel Barkal). I want to thank you for your guiding on the site
    and allowing us to be there and understand your research on Amara site.

    Like

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