British Museum blog

Amara West 2012: an everyday mystery


Neal Spencer, British Museum

The reality of excavating an ancient urban site quickly dispels visions of unearthing gilded funerary masks, finely carved stone statues or papyri bearing literary texts. Nonetheless, studying the wide range of tools, items of adornment, ritual objects and of course pottery found amidst our houses and streets can provide much information about the inhabitants and their activities.

Pottery discs recovered from one deposit excavated this season

But many finds perplex us. And none more so than two types of artefact that turn up in nearly every deposit we excavate.

A sandstone sphere

Firstly: pottery discs. These small objects, generally 2-4cm in diameter are made from broken fragments of pottery vessels, recut into round (or nearly round) shapes. What were these for? As they are rarely found in their original context, it is impossible to say. In all likelihood, they had multiple uses: as counters, gaming pieces, weights, used as smoothers, or even to act as stoppers in narrow jars. When there is a hole cut in the centre, they may have had a different purpose, perhaps used in weaving textiles.

Secondly: sandstone spheres. We find a similar quantity of these, roughly worked, ‘marbles’. Again, they probably had many uses, including some of the same purposes as the pottery discs. We also find similar artefacts made of unfired clay.

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Find out more about the Amara West research project

Filed under: Amara West, Archaeology

2 Responses - Comments are closed.

  1. evalmedi says:

    Stone marbles = Ammunition for slingshots? … Just guessing…. Rob

  2. ounogi niri says:

    may be the pottery discs could also serve to dry wet clay objects before or during firing.
    ????
    in any case it’s a nice enigma!

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