British Museum blog

Amara West 2012: a pottery kiln?


Shadia Abdu Rabo, National Corporation for Antiquities and Museums, Sudan and Neal Spencer, British Museum

Towards the end of the season, working in layers beneath house E13.8, we found a circular kiln – our first at Amara West.

The kiln had been made by cutting a deep pit into the natural surface of the island, and building a circular brick structure above it, with internal cross walls. The red-orange colour of the bricks, especially on the inside, were the first indication that this might have been a kiln for firing pottery vessels, with an upper chamber for placing the pots to be fired, and the lower space – cut into the alluvium – housing the burning fuel (wood, charcoal?). A shallow pit, sloping down to the entrance of the kiln, would have allowed the fuel to be inserted into the lower chamber.

The kiln with the later wall of house E13.8 built over the top

The kiln with the later wall of house E13.8 built over the top

We only excavated part of the lower chamber, as a wall of the later house ran over it. Inside, we found debris which post-dates the abandonment of the kiln, but right at the base were the compact ashy deposits we would expect in such a structure. Beneath that lay the burnt natural surface. There was clear evidence for the kiln being refurbished, with extra layers of plaster added to line the inside.

Many questions remain: what types of objects or vessels were fired in this kiln? What temperature could it have reached? We have taken samples from the walls, and the deposits inside, which might shed light on how this structure was used.

It is also interesting to consider how the kiln fitted into urban life. We found very little evidence for architecture in this area, so this might have been an open space between the house to the south (E13.3) and the imposing town wall – suitable for what must have been a smoky, dirty activity.

There’s a description of ‘the potter’ in a famous Egyptian literary text, the Satire of the Trades, which caricatures the profession as follows:

He is muddier with clay than swine
to burn under his earth.
His clothes are solid as a block
and his headcloth is rags,
until the air enters his nose
coming from his furnace direct.

Leave a comment or tweet using #amarawest

Find out more about the Amara West research project

Filed under: Amara West, Archaeology, Research, , ,

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 9,205 other followers

Categories

Follow @britishmuseum on Twitter

British Museum on Instagram

A new series for #MuseumOfTheFuture – we're posting pics of all our galleries. This is Room 1, Enlightenment. The Enlightenment was an age of reason and learning that flourished across Europe and America from about 1680 to 1820. This rich and diverse permanent exhibition uses thousands of objects to demonstrate how people in Britain understood their world during this period. It is housed in the King’s Library, the former home of the library of King George III. Objects on display reveal the way in which collectors, antiquaries and travellers during this great age of discovery viewed and classified objects from the world around them.
The displays provide an introduction to the Museum and its collection, showing how our understanding of the world of nature and human achievement has changed over time.

The Enlightenment Gallery is divided into seven sections that explore the major new disciplines of the age: religion and ritual, trade and discovery, the birth of archaeology, art and civilisation, classifying the world, the decipherment of ancient scripts, and natural history. It was opened in 2003 to celebrate the 250th anniversary of the British Museum. This half-term take a #NightAtTheMuseum family trail in 12 #MuseumMileLDN locations. Visit any of the museums for a chance to win a trip to LA!
museum-mile.org.uk
#family #museum #movie #film #halfterm #holidays Our exhibition #MemoriesOfANation is now open! From Renaissance to reunification, this exhibition explores 600 years of German history.
Book your tickets now at britishmuseum.org/germany
#Germany #exhibition #london #museum #history Artist James Tissot was born #onthisday in 1836. Here's a print of a young woman in summer
#art #history #print #summer #artist Due to popular demand, our #8mummies exhibition is now extended until April 2015!
#mummy #museum #exhibition Studies drawn from a live model by artist Antoine Watteau, born #onthisday in 1684 
#art #history #drawing
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 9,205 other followers

%d bloggers like this: