British Museum blog

A new world in a familiar setting


Philippa Edwards, Project Manager, British Museum

2012 is my fifth year working at the British Museum and also sees me working on my fifth forecourt Landscape project. During these five years I have not only learnt lots of about the habitats and plants of four different continents (Asia, Africa, Australia and now North America) but I have also honed my project management skills. I feel like I have set up enough meetings, taken enough minutes and updated enough schedules to last for another five years!

But when I see the first bit of soil turned and the West Lawn rapidly transforming into another far-off habitat it seems all worthwhile. I am currently watching a piece of North America be installed in front of me, with the boardwalk over the swamp taking pride of place, many of the woodland trees planted (which are going to look amazing in autumn/fall), and the prairie grasses will soon be rustling in the Bloomsbury breeze.

Boardwalk in the North American Landscape

Quite a few people have asked me over the years how we make the decision of which theme the next Landscape will feature, and in particular how we decided on North America this year. We always try to tie the Landscapes in with the public programmes of both Kew and the BM, and also look for ways to highlight the wonderful work Kew is doing around the globe. North America was a region not yet covered in our series of Landscapes, and this Landscape gives us the ability to showcase some of the spectacular and unique flora of this continent and highlight the relationships between British Museum and Kew objects, and Kew’s work addressing threats to North American habitats.

As the Museum forecourt continues to be transformed over the next few (soggy) days I will continue to hold meetings and circulate minutes, happy in the knowledge that every time I pop outside I will be one step closer to escaping to a whole new continent, without even leaving work…

North American Landscape: Kew at the British Museum is open from 10 May to 25 November 2012. Follow the build

In partnership with the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Supported by the American Express Foundation

Filed under: North American Landscape: Kew at the British Museum

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This is our next gallery space in the #MuseumOfTheFuture series. It's Room 64, the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Gallery of Early Egypt. Rapid advances in the technology and social organisation of Egypt during the 5th millennium BC produced a material culture of increasing sophistication. Further innovations followed in about 3100 BC when the separate Predynastic peoples of Upper and Lower Egypt were united under a single ruler. The resulting increase in wealth and strong central control led to dramatic achievements in architecture, writing and fine goods, culminating in the building of the Great Pyramids of Giza in around 2600 BC.
Objects on display in Room 64 illustrate the cultural, technological and political development of early civilisation in Egypt throughout this period. In this picture you can see Gebelein Man, a mummy who was naturally preserved in the desert sands, and who used to have the unofficial nickname of Ginger (although the Museum doesn't use this name). In the background you can see an interactive virtual autopsy of the mummy which was installed in the newly refurbished gallery last year. It's Toulouse-Lautrec's 150th birthday! Here's his poster for a Parisian cabaret 
#history #art #artist #Paris Although this gilded cartonnage mask of a mummy conveys vitality and alertness, the features are more bland and idealised than those of other masks. The eyes, ears, nose, mouth and chin are highly stylised and not fully integrated into the face. The collar, the wig and the necklace with an ankh (‘life’) pendant, are attributes showing that the deceased has entered the afterlife and been assimilated with the gods. A winged scarab beetle on the top and images of gods on the back also emphasise the funerary character of the mask.

The use of gold was connected to the belief that the sun god Re, with whom the mummy hoped to be united, had flesh of pure gold. The back of the wig is decorated in many colours, with a row of deities, a ba and falcon with outstretched wings and seven short columns of near-unintelligible hieroglyphs.

See this cartonnage mask in our exhibition #8mummies – now extended until 19 April 2015.
#MummyMonday #mummies Another #MummyMonday space: it's Room 63 – together with Room 62 known as the Roxie Walker Galleries of Egyptian death and afterlife: mummies. Possibly the most famous galleries in the Museum, they are the next spaces in our #MuseumOfTheFuture series. Death and the afterlife held particular significance and meaning for the ancient Egyptians. Complex funeral preparations and rites were thought to be needed to ensure the transition of the individual from earthly existence to immortality.
Mummification, magic and ritual are investigated through the objects on display in Rooms 62–63. These include coffins, mummies, funerary masks, portraits and other items designed to be buried with the deceased. Modern research methods such as x-rays and CT scans are used to examine the mummification process. As it's #MummyMonday here's Room 62 – together with Room 63 known as the Roxie Walker Galleries of Egyptian death and afterlife: mummies. Possibly the most famous galleries in the Museum, they are the next spaces in our #MuseumOfTheFuture series. Death and the afterlife held particular significance and meaning for the ancient Egyptians. Complex funeral preparations and rites were thought to be needed to ensure the transition of the individual from earthly existence to immortality.
Mummification, magic and ritual are investigated through the objects on display in Rooms 62–63. These include coffins, mummies, funerary masks, portraits and other items designed to be buried with the deceased. Modern research methods such as x-rays and CT scans are used to examine the mummification process. It's time for our next #MuseumOfTheFuture gallery space. This is Room 61, the Michael Cohen Gallery of Egyptian life and death (the tomb-chapel of Nebamun). The British Museum acquired 11 wall-paintings from the tomb-chapel of a wealthy Egyptian official called Nebamun in the 1820s. Dating from about 1350 BC, they are some of the most famous works of art from ancient Egypt.
Following a 10-year period of conservation and research, the paintings were put on display together for the first time in 2009. They give the impression of the walls of colour that would have been experienced by the ancient visitors to the tomb-chapel.
Objects dating from the same time period and a 3D animation of the tomb-chapel help to set the tomb-chapel in context and show how the finished tomb would have looked. (There is no Room 60 in the British Museum.)
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