British Museum blog

A new world in a familiar setting


Philippa Edwards, Project Manager, British Museum

2012 is my fifth year working at the British Museum and also sees me working on my fifth forecourt Landscape project. During these five years I have not only learnt lots of about the habitats and plants of four different continents (Asia, Africa, Australia and now North America) but I have also honed my project management skills. I feel like I have set up enough meetings, taken enough minutes and updated enough schedules to last for another five years!

But when I see the first bit of soil turned and the West Lawn rapidly transforming into another far-off habitat it seems all worthwhile. I am currently watching a piece of North America be installed in front of me, with the boardwalk over the swamp taking pride of place, many of the woodland trees planted (which are going to look amazing in autumn/fall), and the prairie grasses will soon be rustling in the Bloomsbury breeze.

Boardwalk in the North American Landscape

Quite a few people have asked me over the years how we make the decision of which theme the next Landscape will feature, and in particular how we decided on North America this year. We always try to tie the Landscapes in with the public programmes of both Kew and the BM, and also look for ways to highlight the wonderful work Kew is doing around the globe. North America was a region not yet covered in our series of Landscapes, and this Landscape gives us the ability to showcase some of the spectacular and unique flora of this continent and highlight the relationships between British Museum and Kew objects, and Kew’s work addressing threats to North American habitats.

As the Museum forecourt continues to be transformed over the next few (soggy) days I will continue to hold meetings and circulate minutes, happy in the knowledge that every time I pop outside I will be one step closer to escaping to a whole new continent, without even leaving work…

North American Landscape: Kew at the British Museum is open from 10 May to 25 November 2012. Follow the build

In partnership with the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Supported by the American Express Foundation

Filed under: North American Landscape: Kew at the British Museum

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