British Museum blog

A new world in a familiar setting


Philippa Edwards, Project Manager, British Museum

2012 is my fifth year working at the British Museum and also sees me working on my fifth forecourt Landscape project. During these five years I have not only learnt lots of about the habitats and plants of four different continents (Asia, Africa, Australia and now North America) but I have also honed my project management skills. I feel like I have set up enough meetings, taken enough minutes and updated enough schedules to last for another five years!

But when I see the first bit of soil turned and the West Lawn rapidly transforming into another far-off habitat it seems all worthwhile. I am currently watching a piece of North America be installed in front of me, with the boardwalk over the swamp taking pride of place, many of the woodland trees planted (which are going to look amazing in autumn/fall), and the prairie grasses will soon be rustling in the Bloomsbury breeze.

Boardwalk in the North American Landscape

Quite a few people have asked me over the years how we make the decision of which theme the next Landscape will feature, and in particular how we decided on North America this year. We always try to tie the Landscapes in with the public programmes of both Kew and the BM, and also look for ways to highlight the wonderful work Kew is doing around the globe. North America was a region not yet covered in our series of Landscapes, and this Landscape gives us the ability to showcase some of the spectacular and unique flora of this continent and highlight the relationships between British Museum and Kew objects, and Kew’s work addressing threats to North American habitats.

As the Museum forecourt continues to be transformed over the next few (soggy) days I will continue to hold meetings and circulate minutes, happy in the knowledge that every time I pop outside I will be one step closer to escaping to a whole new continent, without even leaving work…

North American Landscape: Kew at the British Museum is open from 10 May to 25 November 2012. Follow the build

In partnership with the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Supported by the American Express Foundation

Filed under: North American Landscape: Kew at the British Museum

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This is Room 69a, our next #MuseumOfTheFuture gallery space. It's used for small temporary displays by the Coins and Medals Department – the current one is all about trade and exchange in the Indian Ocean. You can see the entrance to the Department in the background of this pic – it's designed like a bank vault as the Coins and Medals collection is all stored within the Department. Born #onthisday in 1757: poet and printmaker William Blake. This is his Judgement of Paris Happy #Thanksgiving to our US friends! Anyone for #turkey? This is Room 69, Greek and Roman life. It's the next gallery space in our #MuseumOfTheFuture series.
Room 69 takes a cross-cultural look at the public and private lives of the ancient Greeks and Romans. The objects on display have been chosen to illustrate themes such as women, children, household furniture, religion, trade and transport, athletics, war, farming and more. Around the walls, supplementary displays illustrate individual crafts on one side of the room, and Greek mythology on the opposite side. This picture is taken from the mezzanine level, looking down into the gallery. The next gallery in our #MuseumOfTheFuture series is Room 68, the Citi Money Gallery. The history of money can be traced back over 4,000 years. During this time, currency has taken many different forms, from coins to banknotes, shells to mobile phones.
The Citi Money Gallery displays the history of money around the world. From the earliest evidence, to the latest developments in digital technology, money has been an important part of human societies. Looking at the history of money gives us a way to understand the history of the world – from the earliest coins to Bitcoin, and from Chinese paper money to coins from every nation in the world. You can find out more about what's on display at britishmuseum.org/money The next gallery in our #MuseumOfTheFuture series is Room 67: Korea. The Korea Foundation Gallery is currently closed for refurbishment and will reopen on 16 December 2014. You can find out more about the refurb at koreabritishmuseum.tumblr.com  The unique culture of Korea combines a strong sense of national identity with influences from other parts of the Far East. Korean religion, language, geography and everyday life were directly affected by the country’s geographic position, resulting in a rich mix of art and artefacts.
Objects on display in Room 67 date from prehistory to the present day and include ceramics, metalwork, sculpture, painting, screen-printed books and illuminated manuscripts.
A reconstruction of a traditional sarangbang, or scholar’s study, is also on display and was built by contemporary Korean craftsmen.
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