British Museum blog

The tale of a tapestry



Maggie Wood, Keeper of Social History,
Warwickshire Museum Service

The Sheldon Tapestry Map of Warwickshire was woven in the 1590s, and was one of a set of four tapestry maps made to hang in Ralph Sheldon’s house in south Warwickshire.

It’s a rare and wonderful pictorial representation of Elizabethan Warwickshire – a bird’s eye view of Shakespeare’s landscape.

Before arrival at the British Museum for the exhibition Shakespeare: staging the world, the tapestry has spent over a year undergoing conservation. This work has enabled us to get close to the tapestry, and make exciting discoveries!

Removing the old lining revealed the vibrant original colour – it was very green! Light has faded the yellow colour from the green wool, so that the tapestry front now looks blue instead of green.

Original green and yellow on reverse of tapestry, contrasted with faded colour on the front

The tapestry’s border was replaced in the 17th century. Removing the lining revealed fragments of the original Elizabethan border – much more lively and colourful than the later replacement.

Original tapestry border

In April 2011, the tapestry went to Belgium to be wet-cleaned. De Wit is a famous tapestry workshop which has developed a safe and fast method of wet-cleaning large textiles. The Sheldon Tapestry was washed, rinsed and dried in one day!

Water samples taken during the wet-cleaning, with dirtiest on left!

Gently sponging the tapestry during wet-cleaning

Wet-cleaning didn’t restore the original bright colour, lost through light damage, but it did make tiny details easier to see.

The Rollright Stones, a Neolithic monument built at a similar time to Stonehenge, appear on the tapestry in the lower right corner. They are very hard to spot!
This is probably the first known visual depiction of this ancient site.

Rollright Stones – just below the windmill

We’ve now noticed that this bear’s claws are blue and that there are many tiny cottages hidden in the Forest of Arden.

Left: Bear with blue claws Right: Cottage in the Forest of Arden

We have made many new and fascinating discoveries during the last year, which has helped to build our knowledge of this wonderful object and its history.

Raising the tapestry into place with pulleys

See related article published 30 August 2012 in The Art Newspaper: Ancient Stones revealed on tapestry (This information was added on 13 September 2012)

Shakespeare: staging the world is open from 19 July to 25 November 2012.

The exhibition is supported by BP.
Part of the World Shakespeare Festival and London 2012 Festival.

Tweet using #ShakespeareExhibition and @britishmuseum

If you would like to leave a comment click on the title

Filed under: Shakespeare: staging the world, , ,

7 Responses - Comments are closed.

  1. ritaroberts says:

    What a fantastic achievment in the conservation of this wonderful tapestry. Thankyou for sharing your work with us.

    Like

  2. ritaroberts says:

    Reblogged this on Ritaroberts's Blog and commented:
    A wonderful achievement on this beautiful tapestry

    Like

  3. Chris says:

    It’s restoration, not conservation.

    Like

    • Maggie Wood says:

      Hello Chris,
      Thanks for your comment.
      I’m interested that you think the work on the tapestry has been ‘restoration’ rather than ‘conservation’!
      ‘Restoration’ usually implies attempting to restore an object to as near its original condition as possible.
      ‘Conservation’ is work to make an object safe, so that it will hopefully survive into the future. Conservation work doesn’t try to make an object look as good as new, and it tries to use ‘reversible’ methods. All work is documented so that it’s quite clear what has been done, and what has been left alone.
      The work done on the tapestry falls into this category.

      Maggie Wood
      Keeper of Social History
      Warwickshire Museum Service

      Like

  4. Erma J Loveland says:

    So glad that preservation efforts continue to keep these items to tell their stories for many more years. Thanks for your work.

    Like

  5. Uta Gisela Richter says:

    It is nice, to see some pictures of the conversation and read the comments.
    Thanks
    Uta

    Like

  6. Uta Gisela Richter says:

    I wanted to write conservation not conversation sorry.

    Like

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 15,705 other followers

Categories

Follow @britishmuseum on Twitter

British Museum on Instagram

Happy #ValentinesDay! To celebrate, we’ll be sharing some of the love stories in the Museum. This image shows the Roman emperor Hadrian with his lover Antinous. Hadrian (r. AD 117–138) had married into the imperial family, but in his late forties he met a Greek youth named Antinous from Bithynia, now in modern Turkey. The young man became the emperor’s lover, but drowned in the Nile in AD 130. Hadrian founded a city named Antinooplis at this site, and made him into a god – an honour usually reserved for members of the emperor’s family. Hadrian publicly commemorated Antinous in huge number of statues, figures, portraits and coins across the Roman world, an almost unparalleled public memorial to a lost love. The statues of Hadrian and Antinous can now be found together, side by side, in Room 70.
#history #valentines #love #Hadrian #💘 This envelope, with a colourful design on its front and a red background and reverse, is typical of the 1990s and early 21st century. On the front is a traditional sailing boat, or junk, sailing on a calm sea with just a few clouds high in the sky. The four characters written on the main sail wish for 'the wind in your sails'. This phrase is used as a general wish for good luck, but is especially used to wish 'Bon Voyage' to someone setting out on a journey. There are five other good luck wishes on the front, all presented as though stamped images from a carved seal. They wish for peace and calm, wind in your sails, a wonderful future, abundance and profit. Wishing everyone a happy #ChineseNewYear! #GongXiFaCai The inscription on this tall red envelope translates as 'Good luck in all you wish for!' Above the inscription are illustrations of three objects representing traditional forms of money in China, and a ruyi sceptre. The traditional forms of money include spade money, a coin with a square hole in the middle, and a small silver ingot. Unlike real coins, the spade and coin carry good luck wishes: 'good luck' (on the spade) 'in all you wish for' (on the coin).The ruyi sceptre also conveys a wish for good luck as ruyi means 'all you wish for'. Happy #ChineseNewYear! #GongXiFaCai Happy #ChineseNewYear! These are called xiao hongbao, literally translated as 'little red envelopes'. Red is the colour associated with celebration in China. In the 1990s, a new style of money envelope appeared. Although it still had a red back, the front was printed in many colours and overstamped in gold. On this envelope there are lush peony flowers in full bloom. They are symbolic of spring, as well as feminine beauty, love and affection. In Chinese, the peony is known as mudanhua or fuguihua. The characters fu ('wealth') and gui ('honour') appear frequently in good luck wishes, and pictures of peony flowers add strength to the wish. The inscription on this envelope reads 'May wealth and honour blossom, in abundance year after year'. The arrangement of the peonies and the inscription is reminiscent of traditional Chinese flower painting. #GongXiFaCai We welcome nearly 7 million visitors a year to the Museum and this photo by @zoenorfolk wonderfully captures the movement of people around the Great Court. Completed in 2000, the Great Court also features a quote by Tennyson: 'and let thy feet millenniums hence be set in the midst of knowledge...’
#repost #regram
Share your photos of the British Museum with us using #mybritishmuseum and tag @britishmuseum In 2000, the Queen Elizabeth II Great Court designed by Foster and Partners transformed the Museum’s inner courtyard into the largest covered public square in Europe. We love this striking photo by @adders77 showing this incredible space at night #regram #repost
Share your photos of the British Museum with us using #mybritishmuseum and tag @britishmuseum
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 15,705 other followers

%d bloggers like this: