British Museum blog

A famous feline travels far north….

Bronze figure of a seated cat

Neal Spencer, and Claire Messenger, British Museum

As the exquisite copper alloy figurine of a cat, inlaid with silver and adorned with gold jewellery, was carefully placed in the showcase, we wondered whether pharaonic objects had ever been seen this far north. Not in the UK, but elsewhere? Lerwick, site of the Shetland Museum and Archives lies at 60°15’N, eclipsing St Petersburg, and its Hermitage Museum, but also Helsinki, Uppsala and Bergen.

Claire Messenger and Neal Spencer put the finishing touches on the display

Claire Messenger and Neal Spencer put the finishing
touches to the display

This collaboration is one of a series of ‘spotlight loans’ of iconic British Museum objects to museums across the UK, supported by the Art Fund. The Shetland Museum opened in 2007, with state of the art security and climate control, combining historic boat sheds with a new building overlooking Hay Dock. Galleries within explore the history and cultures of the islands, alongside space for temporary exhibitions. The British Museum collaborated on the loan of the Lewis Chessmen last year, objects with a clear Scottish history. But why send an Egyptian cat?

The loan allows audiences that might never
visit museums with Egyptian collections to appreciate first hand the exquisite quality of ancient Egyptian bronze-working, while also evoking the mysterious nature of Egyptian religion, where gods could be depicted as animals. Schools in England typically teach ancient Egypt, but this is not normally the case in Shetland. The cat’s arrival has prompted some Shetland teachers to introduce the subject, and hundreds of schoolchildren are booked in to see the display in the coming months. And, as in London or Paris (the only cities to have ever seen the cat since it first appeared in Cairo in 1934) many of the visitors I met also professed to an obsession with cats. Ancient Egypt and felines: a potent mix!

Bronze figure of a seated cat, from Saqqara, Egypt Late Period, after 600 BC

Bronze figure of a seated cat, from Saqqara, Egypt Late Period, after 600 BC

But this was no pet. The statue represents a goddess, most likely Bastet, and was probably set up in a temple dedicated to her. As the original base of the figure is lost, we will probably never know who donated the statue to a temple, though the size, quality and precious adornments of this cat suggest it was a wealthy individual, perhaps even a king. In return, the donor might have hoped for a long life, children or a good burial, gifts the goddess could bestow on an individual. More prosaically, the donor would surely have enhanced his or her reputation among their contemporaries.

The display also highlights the work undertaken by museum scientists, which revealed the extensive repairs Gayer-Anderson undertook on the cat.

British Museum objects from ancient Egypt can also currently be seen in two partnership galleries, in Newcastle and Glasgow, while the touring exhibition Pharaoh: King of Egypt, is currently on display in Birmingham.

The Gayer-Anderson Cat is on display at Shetland Museum and Archives until December 9

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  1. Campbell@Manchester says:

    Reblogged this on Egypt at the Manchester Museum and commented:
    Great blog about the display of the BM’s iconic Gayer Anderson cat… in Shetland!

    Like

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Nakamura Hikaru represents the most recent generation of manga artists and is currently the seventh bestselling manga artist in Japan. Fusing everyday life with youth culture and cutting-edge production techniques, her work in this display imagines the comical existence of Jesus and Buddha as flatmates in Tokyo.

See this, alongside two other contemporary manga artworks in our new free display: #MangaNow

#japan #manga #jesus #buddha #tokyo #art

Nakamura Hikaru (b. 1984), Jesus and Buddha drawing manga. Cover artwork for Saint Oniisan vol. 10. Digital print, hand drawn with colour added on computer, 2014. © Nakamura Hikaru/Kodansha Ltd. The second generation of contemporary manga in our free #MangaNow display is represented by Hoshino Yukinobu, one of Japan’s best-known science fiction manga artists. This is a portrait of his new character: Rainman.

Hoshino Yukinobu’s 'Professor Munakata’s British Museum Adventure' featured in a similar display in 2011.  #japan #manga #rainman #art

Hoshino Yukinobu (b. 1954), Rainman. Ink on paper, 2015. © Hoshino Yukinobu. Our free display ‪#‎MangaNow is now open! It features three original artworks that show how the medium has evolved over generations, revealing the breadth and depth of manga in Japan today.

This is an original colour drawing of a golfer on a green by prominent and influential manga artist Chiba Tetsuya. He is a specialist of sports manga that relate a young person’s struggle for recognition through dedication to sport.

#japan #manga #golf #art 
Chiba Tetsuya (b. 1939), Fair Isle Lighthouse Keepers Golf Course, Scotland. Ink and colour on paper, 2015. Loaned by the artist. © Chiba Tetsuya. This is the Codex Sinaiticus, the world’s oldest surviving Bible. It’s a star loan from @britishlibrary in our forthcoming #EgyptExhibition and dates back to the 4th century AD. 
Handwritten in Greek, not long after the reign of the Roman emperor Constantine the Great (AD 306–337), it contains the earliest complete manuscript of the New Testament. 
The codex will be displayed alongside two other founding texts of the Hebrew and Muslim faiths: the First Gaster Bible, also being loaned by @britishlibrary, and a copy of the Qur’an from @bodleianlibs in Oxford. These important texts show the transition of Egypt from a world of many gods to a majority Christian and then majority Muslim society, with Jewish communities periodically thriving throughout.  #Egypt #history #bible #faith #onthisday in 31 BC: Cleopatra and Mark Antony were defeated by Octavian at the Battle of Actium. After the death of Cleopatra, Egypt was brought into the Roman Empire and the ancient Egyptian gods, such as the falcon god Horus shown here, were reimagined in Roman dress to establish the new authority. 
Discover how Egypt’s religious and political landscape was transformed over 12 centuries in our #EgyptExhibition, opening 29 October 2015.

#history #ancientEgypt #Cleopatra #RomanEmpire New exhibition announced: ‘Egypt: faith after the pharaohs’ opens 29 October 2015

Discover Egypt’s journey over 1,200 years, as Jews, Christians and Muslims transformed an ancient land. From 30 BC to AD 1171, #EgyptExhibition charts the change from a world of many gods to the worship of one God.

Tickets now on sale at britishmuseum.org/egypt

#egypt #history #faith
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