British Museum blog

The Beau Street Hoard: the end of the excavation

Beau Street Hoard excavationJulia Tubman, conservator, British Museum

My last blog post recounted the excavation of bags 5 and 6 of the Beau Street hoard, which were the two smallest bags on the edge of the large hoard. In the months since, the deconstruction of the hoard has advanced considerably: as the excavation progressed I naturally became faster and more confident in removing the coins, and am pleased to announce the end of this stage of the project. The hoard was well organised, with the coins carefully sorted into bags according to denomination and level of debasement; specialists here at the British Museum now have a fascinating mystery to interpret.

The hoard towards the end of the excavation

The hoard towards the end of the excavation

In total eight bags were found in the hoard, which is two more than originally identified in the x-ray. Squeezed between the larger ‘bag 2’ and the centre of the hoard were two tiny bags, the coins of which are very similar to those contained within bag 2 – small radiate coins minted by Gallienus, Claudius Gothicus and Tetricus I.

Luckily, at the end of the excavation I was able to lift the large, central moneybag (known as bag ‘4’), whole, as I had removed all of the bags of coins surrounding it. The excellent preservation of this moneybag, which weighs nearly 11 kilograms, presents us with a very exciting opportunity. Already a laser scan of the bag has been undertaken to produce a rotating three-dimensional image, and a second scan will be taken before the end of the year which will be used to produce a facsimile to go on display in Bath. These scans provide us with a lasting document of the moneybag, which will now be de-constructed and the coins cleaned.

Moneybag 4

Moneybag 4

The block was x-rayed before the excavation of the moneybags, and so the base holding the coins had to be x-rayed after the removal of the last bag, to check that there were no ‘surprise’ bags beneath those already excavated. The x-ray showed only a few coins on the periphery of the base, and so we can move towards giving a final count for the number of coins in the hoard as a whole: at the moment it looks to be around half of the original estimate of 30,000.

Now the excavation is complete, I will be fully focused on getting all of the coins cleaned so that they can be identified by numismatists, who will begin to compile an ‘Emperor count’.

We knew at the beginning of the project that this would be a short excavation, and the perfect opportunity to experiment with time-lapse photography. Before I began the excavation, a camera was positioned on a workbench above the hoard, and programmed to take a photograph of the stationary block every 10 minutes. This short video neatly captures the deconstruction of the hoard, and makes for a fantastic record of the excavation.

On Friday 30 November, Stephen Clews from the Roman Baths, British Museum curators Richard Abdy and Eleanor Ghey, and I will be discussing the story of the Beau Street Hoard so far in a lecture at the British Museum.

Find out more about the Beau Street hoard and the Roman Baths Museum fund-raising campaign.

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Filed under: Beau Street Hoard, Conservation, Research, , , ,

11 Responses - Comments are closed.

  1. jennnadams says:

    I would be like a kid in a candy store finding that. Curious to see it all cleaned up.

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  2. beeseeker says:

    Intriguing – the history just keeps turning up!

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  3. Heulwen Renshaw says:

    How exiting this story has been, and so historical, I would have loved being there at the excavation of the these bags!

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  4. I love the timelapse video. You are really spoiling us with some fantastic numismatic content recently!

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  5. Does anyone else REALLY want the job of separating them and cleaning them up. That looks like such a fun find. Great job maintaining the integrity of the hoard. Keep us updated.

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  6. ritaroberts says:

    Reblogged this on Ritaroberts's Blog and commented:
    This has been a fantastic project which I have followed from the beginning.

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  7. Now you know the Treasure Hunter in me can only dream of finding a Cache such as THAT!

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  8. Reblogged this on connectedcurriculum and commented:
    A fascinating post from Julia Tubman, conservator from the British Museum, literally unearthing more history. Will be great to see the next stage of their findings as the coins are cleaned and more about the hoard is understood.

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  9. Eleanor Ghey says:

    Part of the hoard is now on temporary display in the Citi Money Gallery at the British Museum. Watch this space for a blog update coming soon.

    Like

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