British Museum blog

Introducing our new, fully-operational, beta collection search

‘Town and Country’ dinnerware, designed by Eva Zeisel, 1945-46Matthew Cock, Head of web, British Museum

'Town and Country' dinnerware, designed by Eva Zeisel, 1945-46

‘Town and Country’ dinnerware, designed by Eva Zeisel, 1945-46

In a recent post, I wrote about the launch of our new collection search beta. Well, we’ve now gone a bit further, and released an overhaul of the ‘advanced search’ functionality.

At heart, it works the same as before – users begin their search by selecting the ‘controlled terms’ that are used by our curators and cataloguers when creating the records, and retrieve all objects in the database that have been tagged with that term, or set of terms in combination. So, for example, you can find groups of objects for any combinations of terms – all the prints made in Japan between AD 1800 and 1835 perhaps, or all objects from London, Exeter and Glasgow made of bronze and so on.

Most of the lists of terms are also structured in hierarchies – for example, Paris is under France – so a search for objects from France retrieves all objects tagged with France, and any objects tagged with one of the many place names that are nested under France. In addition, we allow people to filter on the different ‘associations’ after they have made a search, for example, they can choose whether or not to include objects based on whether they are made by, attributed to, a depiction of, an artist.

In the current collection search interface (launched 2007), the user had to follow quite a process to build up their search terms and get to a page of results, and the interface wasn’t very intuitive. Only a small proportion of people used the advanced search, and most people we talked to said it wasn’t obvious how to use it.

There are two main changes that we have made to improve it. Firstly, we are using “auto-complete” – so that as you write the first few letters of your search term, a set of possible complete terms is shown based on the terms that we have in the database, along with some description so you can be sure it is the term you intended (for example, dates to help distinguish several artists with the same surname).

Secondly, we have kept the search criteria and the results showing on the same page. The user doesn’t have to travel back and forth between different pages to update their search.

We’re very aware that we have been looking at this for quite a while, and it is about time it was let loose and tested in the wild. We are really interested in any comments or questions that you have on how it works – whether you are a regular user, or using it for the first time. We hope to release this as the main interface to the collection database in the Spring.

Please add a comment below, or email us at web@britishmuseum.org and include COL Beta in the subject line.

If you would like to leave a comment click on the title

Filed under: At the Museum, Collection

3 Responses - Comments are closed.

  1. Lisa says:

    This is fantastic news for researchers and writers. Thank you!

    Like

  2. jeffhatt says:

    I’ve used the search facility for the last few months researching Iron Age bucket mounts, the Hounslow Hoard, monumental brass letters, et al, and with surprisingly good results just recently! My only reservation is that links often lead to nowhere but by backwinding it’s all available one way or the other. The three Welwyn burial heads appeared as if by magic just at the weekend — I’d tried for ages to get info on them but failed before.

    My hearty thanks to Julia Farley who on request made pictures of the Alchurch bucket mounts, sent me the lot and then published them on the database for all to see. For research purposes such detail as they revealed was absolutely invaluable and really answered every question I could possibly ask — where the beautiful studio pictures of the same objects were just that — lovely — but uninformative.

    This is going to be a great resource, please keep up the good work!

    Jeff Hatt

    Like

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 9,231 other followers

Categories

Follow @britishmuseum on Twitter

British Museum on Instagram

Horatio Nelson died #onthisday in 1805 at the Battle of Trafalgar. This commemorative medal was intended for presentation to the men who fought under Nelson at Trafalgar, with 19,000 struck in copper, of which 14001 were distributed.
#history #medal #trafalgar #nelson Dutch artist Aelbert Cuyp was born #onthisday in 1620. He seemed to be very fond of cows! The Sydney Opera House opened #onthisday in 1973.

Designed by the Danish architect Jørn Utzon, the Sydney Opera House provoked fierce public controversy in the 1960s as much over the escalating cost of its construction as the innovative brilliance of its domed sail-like halls. Now recognised the world over as a magnificent architectural icon jutting into Sydney Harbour, the Sydney Opera House finally opened in 1973. 
In this Christmas card for 1972 Eric Thake (1904–1982) cheekily anticipates the long awaited opening with his domestic version of the grand architectural statement. Crockery stacked in a drying rack forms the shape of the Sydney Opera House, with water from the kitchen sink adjacent. The small housefly resting on one of the stacked plates adds an unmistakably Australian touch.

Text from Stephen Coppel’s 'Out of Australia: Prints and Drawings from Sidney Nolan to Rover Thomas'
#art #architecture #sydneyoperahouse #sydney #print Born #onthisday in 1632: architect Sir Christopher Wren. Here’s a freehand drawing showing the relationship of the domes of the new St Paul’s Cathedral
#history #architecture #stpauls #London #art Room 4, Egyptian sculpture, is the next gallery in our #MuseumOfTheFuture series. The objects in this gallery range in date from 2600 BC to the 2nd century AD. Large-scale sculpture was an important feature of the great temples and tombs of ancient Egypt and was believed to be imbued with powerful spiritual qualities. Sculptures on display in Room 4 include stylised depictions of kings, deities and symbolic objects ranging from the time of the Old Kingdom to the middle of the Roman Period. There are also architectural pieces from temples and tombs.
An imposing stone bust of the great pharaoh Ramesses II presides over the room, while the world-famous Rosetta Stone (in the foreground of this pic), with its inscribed scripts, demonstrates how Egypt’s ancient form of pictographic writing was deciphered for the first time.
#museum #art #sculpture #history #ancientegypt #egypt #hieroglyphs Next in our #MuseumOfTheFuture series looking at all the galleries in the British Museum, it's Room 3. Since 2005 this room has housed a series of temporary displays – The Asahi Shimbun Displays. Usually focused on one object (although sometimes featuring several), it provides a space in which to experiment with display and interpretation. Displays have featured everything from ancient African hand tools to contemporary art, from Old Masters to manga. The current display (pictured) features an enormous print by Albrecht Dürer.
#museum #art #history
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 9,231 other followers

%d bloggers like this: