British Museum blog

The Beau Street Hoard: counting ancient money

Beau Street HoardEleanor Ghey and Henry Flynn, British Museum

If you listen carefully outside the Department of Coins and Medals at the moment you may hear the chink of money being counted. It’s not a surprise donation or a lottery win, but Roman coins from the Beau Street Hoard being sorted into imperial reign, bag by bag, to obtain an idea of the date and contents of the hoard.

The hoard in May 2012 in the conservation lab, excavation underway.

The hoard in May 2012 in the conservation lab, excavation underway.

We collected the coins from conservator Julia Tubman in stages, as each bag was removed from the soil block the hoard was found in. Some are surprisingly heavy, about as much as I can lift comfortably. The silver coins have a pleasing weight in the hand and do not look over 1,700 years old.

An X-radiograph of the soil block before conservation taken at the Imaging Centre in the University of Southampton’s Department of Engineering Sciences. © University of Southampton

An X-radiograph of the soil block before conservation taken at the Imaging Centre in the University of Southampton’s Department of Engineering Sciences. © University of Southampton

The next stage of our work is to provide information on the hoard so it can be given a provisional valuation as part of the Treasure process. The hoard has already been declared Treasure at inquest under the Treasure Act 1996. Now the coins are almost all separate and reasonably clean, it will be possible for an independent expert to do this. As museum curators, we do not have expertise in questions of commercial value but we provide a listing of the contents. The provisional value is then considered by the Treasure Valuation Committee, which recommends a final value. The purchasing museum (in this case the Roman Baths Museum) is then able to raise funds for this amount, from which a reward is paid to interested parties (usually the finder and landowner) as applicable.

The results so far…

We have been able to sort and count seven of the eight Roman money bags contained within the hoard – one is still undergoing conservation. The total so far is 14,646 coins, but as the final bag is large we expect this to go up to over 16,000 coins.

A table showing the different types and amounts of coins in the hoard

A table showing the different types and amounts of coins in the hoard

In my previous post I described the three different types of coins in the hoard (denarii and early (silvery) and later (debased) radiates). With these three types of coins one might expect a wide date range between the bags. This has not been the case. We have the very latest denarii and late silver radiates, so that the bags could have been deposited within 20 to 30 years of each other (or sorted and re-deposited together). At the moment, the latest coins in the hoard date to the mid AD 270s quite precisely.

Parts of the hoard and some of the tools used by conservator Julia Tubman to excavate it on display

Parts of the hoard and some of the tools used by conservator Julia Tubman to excavate it on display

A conservation-themed display of the Beau Street Hoard is now on show in Case seven of the Citi Money Gallery. This case focuses on Treasure and hoarding and features a changing display intended to highlight new or exciting Treasure finds. The Beau Street display focuses on the excavation of the soil block and subsequent cleaning of the coins by Julia Tubman.

The content of the hoard is represented by three piles of coins – one pile of each denomination found in the moneybags – and the seven-week process of excavation and cleaning is illustrated using time-lapse video footage of the removal of the coins from the soil block.

An X-ray image, which provided the first visual evidence of the grouping of the coins and acted as a guide for the excavation, is also featured in the video. Some of the tools used by Julia during this process are displayed alongside the coins which have been cleaned for identification.

Find out more about the Beau Street hoard and the Roman Baths Museum fund-raising campaign.

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