British Museum blog

New technology in the Samsung Digital Discovery Centre

A group of children using tablets in the museum gallery
Richard Woff, Head of Schools and Young Audiences, British Museum

We have recently re-opened the Samsung Digital Discovery Centre (SDDC) after three months spent installing a range of new digital equipment and developing exciting sessions for the Museum’s young audiences. This activity has been prompted by our participation in a project initiated by Samsung, which aims to unleash the educational power of digital technologies, specifically through the use of tablet devices in schools and in other learning hubs.

Back in July, we had a touch-enabled e-board installed in the SDDC and took delivery of more than thirty of Samsung’s newest touchscreen tablets, as well as 24 new wireless-enabled digital cameras. We then transformed some of the teaching sessions we’d been running in the SDDC to take full advantage of the new devices. Having used a range of mobile technology across our offering for young audiences, we had a good idea of what worked well. For example, we know that revealing tablets in a session always produces gasps of excitement and requests to take the devices home at the end of the day; beyond this excitement, we have also seen that tablet devices can promote collaboration between students, thanks in part to the size of the screen.

A group of children using a tablet in a Museum gallery

A group using a tablet in a Museum gallery

The touchscreen interactivity of the tablets can involve students in a way that paper resources cannot, and can also provide links to a range of media, including sound and video. As well as providing the students with information through tablets, one huge benefit for us is that they can also capture their findings on the same device. The photos, text, videos, drawings or voice recordings that are captured on the tablets in the sessions are instantly uploaded to our cloud storage, making it quick and easy for us to send this work back to schools for further study. This is especially valuable in the activities we run in galleries, where the tablets serve to guide the students, prompt responses and investigation and record their findings and experiences.

Children working on the floor, with paper, pencils and a tablet

Children using a tablet as part of an SDDC activity

One of our sessions focuses on Greek temples and aims to introduce children to the styles of Greek architecture and the functions of a temple, as well as to highlight the diverse nature of the Greek world. Previously, children used laptops to build a virtual temple using the British Museum’s Ancient Greece website with the added challenge of a fixed budget which determined how extravagant they could be in the materials they used and the decoration they applied. We have redeveloped the session so that pairs of children use tablets to test their growing understanding of the architectural styles, and then vote on how they want their communal temple to look – as they vote on the tablets, the scores appear on the e-board until a final decision becomes clear. The children also scan QR codes with their tablets to find out more about the city state they represent and to build their temple. All of the children’s tablets are linked to the e-board, so the session leader can easily select temples that demonstrate the diversity of the groups’ responses to the task.

We have kept the overall aims of the session: the children learn lots about temples; they use maths in a practical context; they learn collaboratively; they get to understand something of the extent and diversity of the ancient Greek world and the politics of temple-building – groups of students that go under budget are usually surprised to learn that this might not delight their city’s rulers any more than going over budget. What has changed is the level of engagement through the tablets. The children’s contributions to the session are more meaningful and apparent, all of them are able to contribute equally rather than a small number children dominating, and they are noticeably even more motivated and enthusiastic than they used to be. The teachers are in no doubt about the richness of the experience: “What amazing technology!” one of them commented, unprompted, as her class left the Centre.

Looking to the future, we aim to maximise the capability of these tablet devices even further. For example, we will be piloting the use of tablets for our digital sessions for students with special educational needs, using the range of media they can showcase for interactive gallery visits. We are also looking to expand our family offering across the devices, including a session planned for the New Year where families will make digital sketches of some of the Museum’s Neolithic collection, and then use these sketches to create their own 3D models.

In the middle of our busy summer preparing to re-open, we received the news that Samsung have agreed to fund the SDDC for a further five years until 2019. This not only secures the existing sessions and activities in the SDDC, it offers us the chance to build on an already large and highly innovative programme to make even more imaginative use of digital technologies to engage young people with the Museum’s objects and the cultures they represent.

The Samsung Digital Discovery Centre is sponsored by Samsung

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Filed under: Samsung Digital Discovery Centre

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  1. Reblogged this on History of Britain and commented:
    #AceHistoryNews says technology helping young people to look back at history and learn from the past #britainshistory

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  2. maximos62 says:

    The temple initiative is excellent, but masks the disregard for and despoliation of the Parthenon that provides the museum with its major source of ancient Greek sculptures. What a pity such beauty has merely been assigned the status of the ‘Museum’s objects’.

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