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BM_14_Clayboards » BM_14_Clayboards

A bulldozer searches for the boards at the bottom of the tipped pile of clay.

A bulldozer searches for the boards at the bottom of the tipped pile of clay.

© Liam O’Connor

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A rare Christian tattoo was found on this naturally mummified woman #MummyMonday 
Discover more hidden secrets in our exhibition #8mummies, until 19 April 2015
#mummies #exhibition #tattoo #history On #StDavidsDay, here’s an allegorical representation of Wales from 1798
#Wales #art #history #March is named after Mars, the Roman god of war. Here’s an engraving from 1698 of him sitting on a cloud.
#art #history #months #print #engraving #Mars Born #onthisday in 1820: Sir John Tenniel, who illustrated the first edition of Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland in 1865. Here's Alice and the Cheshire Cat
#books #history #illustration Every ‪#‎PayDay we're sharing a ‪#‎MoneyFact!
The first coin issued with the dollar denomination was not in the USA, but in West Africa by the British Sierra Leone company in 1791.
You can explore the history of money around the world in the Citi Money Gallery (Room 68): britishmuseum.org/money
#history #money #coins #coin #fact ‪#‎DefiningBeauty opens in one month! Look out for our highlight #FridayFigure each week. 
The exhibition brings these three sculptures together for the first time, creating new narratives.
These sculptures show the work of three of the greatest artists in ancient Greece: Phidias, Myron and Polyclitus. Myron’s discobolus (disc-thrower) is the perfect balance of opposites and Polyclitus' doryphoros (spear-bearer) is constructed on a precise set of ratios. In contrast, Ilissos is carved from life rather than arithmetically calculated. Discover more on tumblr: britishmuseum.tumblr.com
#exhibition #behindthescenes #installation #art #sculpture
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