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This blog aims to share some of the things going on behind the scenes here at the Museum and offer a platform for discussion. Please join in by leaving your comments.

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Also, please be aware that while the majority of British Museum blog posts are written by authors at the Museum, occasionally they will be written by guest bloggers. The views expressed by guest bloggers here (and elsewhere) are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Trustees of the British Museum or their staff.

Comment guidelines

We have a short list of guidelines that all participants on any British Museum online public forum are expected to follow.

By submitting a comment on the British Museum blog, you are confirming that you have read, understood and agreed to these guidelines. The Museum may revise them from time to time, so, please check them regularly.

The British Museum is the sole arbiter of the content of its blog, and therefore retains the right, though not the obligation, to place, edit, classify, or remove any content posted here.

  1. Comments must contribute to the discussion taking place within the thread and be written in a civil and dispassionate manner. Content or a user name which is obscene, defamatory, offensive, harassing, off-topic or otherwise objectionable or unlawful is not acceptable.
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To keep discussions fresh and topical, comment facilities on individual posts will normally be closed two weeks after the date of publication.

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This wonderful photo by @cnorain captures the roof of the Great Court, which includes 3,312 glass panels. Each one is unique as the space is asymmetrical.
#regram #repost #architecture

Share your photos of the British Museum with us using #mybritishmuseum and tag @britishmuseum For #ThrowbackThursday this photograph from 1875 shows the Museum’s first Egyptian Room.
This is one of a collection of photographs taken by the photographer Frederick York of Notting Hill, London in 1875.
#tbt #throwback #archives #mummies We’re delighted to announce our first exhibition of the autumn ‘Drawing in silver and gold: Leonardo to Jasper Johns’, which opens 10 September.
This exhibition will feature around 100 of the best examples of #metalpoint spanning six centuries. Metalpoint is a challenging drawing technique where a metal stylus is used on a roughened preparation, ensuring that a trace of the metal is left on the surface. When mastered it can produce drawings of crystalline clarity and refinement.
This exhibition was organised by the National Gallery of Art, Washington @ngadc in association with the British Museum.
Book your tickets now to see these spectacular works! #art #drawing #Leonardo

Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), Bust of a warrior. Silverpoint, on prepared paper, c. 1475-1480. Can you guess the artist behind this work? 
All will be revealed at our special exhibition announcement tomorrow! #metalpoint Tower Bridge opened #onthisday in 1894. Here’s an early print of the iconic landmark.
#history #London #TowerBridge The mummy case of this temple doorkeeper called Padiamenet is covered with hieroglyphic inscriptions and religious images. The inscriptions on this brilliantly painted cartonnage tell us that he was the Chief Doorkeeper of the Domain of Ra, the Chief Attendant of Ra, and also Chief Barber of the Domain of Ra and of the temple of Amun. This largest scene shows Padiamenet, dressed in a long fringed robe, adoring the god Osiris, who is grasping the royal crook and flail. Behind him stands his sister, the goddess Isis.
Gain a unique insight into the lives of eight people over a remarkable 4,000 years in our #8mummies exhibition, closing 12 July #MummyMonday
#history #mummies #BritishMuseum
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