British Museum blog

Digging Domuztepe: a season at a Neolithic site in Turkey

The camp at Domuztepe

The camp at Domuztepe

Alexandra Fletcher and Rachel Swift are a curator and a conservator working at Domuztepe, a Late Neolithic site (about 6200-5500 BC) in south eastern Turkey. This series of posts traces the weekly progress of their recent excavation season.

Rachel Swift

The dig’s base camp consists of old-fashioned canvas tents clustered around the buildings of a deserted school and arriving again is a strange experience. The weathered statue of Ataturk, stifling heat and friendly faces that greet me are now so familiar that the months since my last visit instantly disappear.

Rachel Swift at work in the conservation area

Rachel Swift at work in the conservation area

As usual, sleep during the first few nights is sporadic and I am woken at intervals by barking dogs, mooing cows and the 4.20am call to prayer. At 7.30am on day one I get to work preparing ‘Conservation Corner’ for action. I discover that writing an inventory of my conservation supplies last year was time well spent as I can now find just about anything in seconds. Oh the wonderful power of lists!

The archaeologists have been busy on site for a week now and a tidy pile of finds awaits my attention. I spend the next few days cleaning 7,000 year-old bone tools, tiny stone beads and fragments of wall plaster (a first for me at Domuztepe) whilst gently sweating and guzzling water to avoid dehydration.


Alexandra Fletcher

Like Rachel I have the strange sense of never really having been away and quickly settle into life in camp. I am pleased to see that the colony of owls that live in the building we use as our workroom are raising babies and that life in the rest of the village continues as normal.

A shade erected over the excavation area keeps the sun off the archaeologists at work

A shade erected over the excavation area keeps the sun off the archaeologists at work

I drive straight out to the site (very carefully as the track is rough and bumpy) and get my first look at what we will be digging this year. Several Neolithic graves have been found and over the next few days these will be photographed, drawn and lifted so excavation can continue beneath them.

A neolithic burial found on site

A neolithic burial found on site

Work has also begun to put in place all the safety equipment we need to dig out a deep well (2.5 metres and still going down).

Our team of workmen shout greetings as I join them and we catch up on a year’s worth of gossip. They come from the villages that nestle alongside other ancient tells (mounds created by hundreds of years of human occupation in one place) that dot the plain around us. This area was once marshland, although it is now drained for farming. Herds of wild pigs once lived here giving the site its name. ‘Domuztepe’ is ‘Pig Hill’ in English.

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Filed under: Archaeology, Domuztepe dig 2011

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