British Museum blog

London, a world city in 20 objects: the Taíno sculpture

 Taino sculptureRebecca Allen, British Museum

This is a Taíno sculpture, probably dating from the fifteenth century. The Taíno were one of the pre-European, native peoples of the Caribbean, and this figure is from Jamaica. The sculpture stands at just over a metre tall, and is made of a very dense tropical hardwood called Guayacan, which has been polished with pebbles to give the surface a deep shine.

It depicts a male spirit-being in a drug-induced trance, and may have been used in religious rituals. In Taino culture this figure embodied the life force, or cemi, which takes many forms and which could do powerful things. The figure is beautifully carved; the sculptor has seen the form of the figure within the wood and carved through to it, meaning that the spirit is found within the wood itself.

 Taino sculpture

Taino sculpture

On the figure’s back a prominent spine has been carved, showing each individual vertebra very clearly, while on the face of the figure tear channels are shown. These are made more conspicuous by the use of gilding. The figure is in suspended animation, frozen in time, as tears stream down his face.

This object featured in the British Museum exhibition Shakespeare: staging the world, supported by BP. At first glance it may seem an odd choice for an exhibition which focused on Elizabethan and Jacobean London, but it has very strong visual and imaginative links with one Shakespeare play in particular: The Tempest.

In the play, a group of sailors are frozen in time by Prospero, a shaman-like figure with magical powers. Prospero commands Ariel, a spirit of the island who owes his freedom to Prospero, to tell him how the enchanted prisoners are faring. Ariel describes the enchantment and tells how one man in particular – Gonzalo – has been trapped in time while tears flow down his cheeks:

Him that you termed, sir, the good old lord Gonzalo:
His tears run down his beard, like winter’s drops
From eaves of reeds.
(The Tempest 5.1.17-19)

This description is evocative of the kind of magical transformation represented by this sculpture. The enchantment Ariel describes is matched in the face of this figure.

Another thematic link with The Tempest lies at the point where Ariel is freed by Prospero from being trapped in an enchanted tree: ‘it was mine art, / When I arrived and heard thee, that made gape / The pine and let thee out’ (1.2.340-2). This is reminiscent of the Taíno understanding that to carve wood is to free the form within it. Ariel, the spirit, has been freed from his imprisonment in the pine.

There are surprising and poetic links between the way Shakespeare imagined the nature of enchantment, and the understandings and insights of the Taíno people of the Caribbean.

This was first published in the London Evening Standard on 1 November 2012.

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2 Responses - Comments are closed.

  1. Nicholas Mercury says:

    Fascinating Really enjoyed the London series.

    Like

  2. Tomas baibramael Gonzalez says:

    BOINAYEL, Son of the Gray Serpent
    In the realm of the Taino spiritual world, deep into the mouth of caves, Cacikes and Bohikes would place twin Cemi. One Cemi known as the son of the Gray Serpent, Boinayel, the other Marohu, meaning bright and cloudless day. Both weather Cemi were bound together and left on an alter. It is said that whenever rain was needed to water their crops. They would enter into these caves with offerings and prayers for these Cemi asking for rain. As the grey serpent clouds gather high over the mountains tops the rain would gather into streams and rivers, thundering down the mountain sides and fertilize the land with their sweet clear water.
    These Cemi where carved out of stones or the hard dens wood of the Guayakan tree. Once carved, they would be highly polished with their distinctive weeping eyes. They would then be placed inside dark and damp caves. As the water condense onto the Cemi it would gather around the slanted eyes forming water droplets that would drip down their faces as tears, turning into rain drops.

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