British Museum blog

Comment guidelines

About the British Museum blog

This blog aims to share some of the things going on behind the scenes here at the Museum and offer a platform for discussion. Please join in by leaving your comments.

Before you do, please read our comment guidelines.

Also, please be aware that while the majority of British Museum blog posts are written by authors at the Museum, occasionally they will be written by guest bloggers. The views expressed by guest bloggers here (and elsewhere) are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Trustees of the British Museum or their staff.

Comment guidelines

We have a short list of guidelines that all participants on any British Museum online public forum are expected to follow.

By submitting a comment on the British Museum blog, you are confirming that you have read, understood and agreed to these guidelines. The Museum may revise them from time to time, so, please check them regularly.

The British Museum is the sole arbiter of the content of its blog, and therefore retains the right, though not the obligation, to place, edit, classify, or remove any content posted here.

  1. Comments must contribute to the discussion taking place within the thread and be written in a civil and dispassionate manner. Content or a user name which is obscene, defamatory, offensive, harassing, off-topic or otherwise objectionable or unlawful is not acceptable.
  2. No spamming.
  3. No repeated submission of the same (or very similar) contributions.
  4. Content submitted to advertise or promote goods and services is not allowed.
  5. All blog contributions must be in the language used in the original post.
  6. No impersonation of someone else.
  7. Blog submissions must not include URLs (web site addresses), unless directly relevant to the blog topic and part of a longer contribution.
  8. Repeated complaints about a single issue or the vexatious use of the complaint facility are not permitted.

Any user who feels a posted message violates these guidelines should contact web@britishmuseum.org

Comments which are perceived to be breaching the guidelines will be removed.

To keep discussions fresh and topical, comment facilities on individual posts will normally be closed two weeks after the date of publication.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 16,360 other followers

Categories

Follow @britishmuseum on Twitter

British Museum on Instagram

Edward Burne-Jones was born #onthisday in 1833. This watercolour from his ‘Flower Book’ is titled ‘White Garden’. This was a name for Atriplex hortensis, a small garden plant that has edible leaves. In this painting Burne-Jones has created an imaginary ‘white garden’, populated with lilies that are being picked by two white-clad angelic figures. Like other figures in his works, they appear dressed in classically inspired white robes, with their blonde hair tied back.
#EdwardBurneJones #BurneJones #PreRaphaelite #flowers In this second watercolour from the ‘Flower Book’ of Pre-Raphaelite artist Edward Burne-Jones, we can see the goddess Venus walking through the night’s sky with doves. This painting is titled ‘Rose of heaven’ – a name given to the plant campion, a small pink flower. Burne-Jones took inspiration from the name of the flower and its connotations, rather than what the flower actually looks like. The depiction of Venus seems to be heavily influenced by Botticelli’s ‘Birth of Venus’, with flowing blonde hair and a dynamic pose.
#EdwardBurneJones #BurneJones #PreRaphaelite #flowers To mark the birthday of Pre-Raphaelite artist Edward Burne-Jones (1833–1898) this week, we’re featuring paintings from his ‘Flower Book’ – a sketchbook full of watercolours and drawings that contained fantasy artworks inspired by the names of flowers. This painting is titled ‘Love in a tangle’ – a name sometimes used for the climbing plant clematis. The scene suggests the story of Ariadne, who gave Greek hero Theseus a ball of golden thread to unwind as he wandered through the labyrinth in search of the minotaur (a mythological creature – half-man and half-bull). Here she waits anxiously for her lover to follow the thread back out of the maze. The clematis and its maze of tangled foliage inspired Burne-Jones to represent this story from ancient Greek mythology in his Flower Book.
#EdwardBurneJones #BurneJones #PreRaphaelite #flowers #mythology Here’s a #regram from @mrapachekat. Doesn’t this lion look majestic? The Museum’s Montague Place entrance is just as grand as the more-visited Main entrance on Great Russell Street. This part of the Museum contains the King Edward VII galleries, and the foundation stone was laid by the King in 1907. This side of the building was designed in the Roman style rather than the Greek Revival of Great Russell Street. It features numerous imperial references, including the coat of arms above the door, and sculptures of lions’ heads and crowns. The architect Sir John James Burnet was knighted for his work designing these galleries, and the building was opened by King George V and Queen Mary in 1914 (Edward VII had died in 1910). #regram #repost #architecture #BritishMuseum #lion Another brilliant photo of the Museum’s Main entrance on Great Russell Street – this time by @violenceor. The perspective gives a good sense of the huge scale of the columns. The Museum has two rows of columns at the main entrance, with each being around 14 metres tall and 1.5 metres wide. Designer Sir Robert Smirke used 44 columns along the front elevation. This design of putting columns in front of an entrance is called a ‘portico’, and was used extensively in ancient Greek and Roman buildings. #regram #repost #architecture #neoclassical #BritishMuseum The Museum looks spectacular with a blue sky overhead – especially in this great shot by @whatrajwants. You can see the beautiful gold flashes shining in the sun. This triangular area above the columns is called a ‘pediment’, and was a common feature in ancient Greek architecture. The copying of classical designs was fashionable during the late 18th and early 19th centuries, and was known as the Greek Revival. The sculptures in the pediment were designed in 1847 by Sir Richard Westmacott and installed in 1851. The pediment originally had a bright blue background, with the statues painted white. #regram #repost #architecture #neoclassical #sculpture #gold #BritishMuseum
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 16,360 other followers