An Indigenous reframing of the fall of the Aztec empire
18 June 2021

On the quincentenary of the fall of the Aztec capital Tenochtitlán, Laura Osorio Sunnucks and María Mercedes Martínez Milantchi explain the importance of centring Indigenous voices when researching this part of history.

Dogs in the Arctic
22 February 2021

Dogs have lived in the Arctic alongside humans for an incredible 17,000 years. Peter Loovers, curator of the Citi exhibition, Arctic: culture and climate explores the special relationship between Arctic Peoples and ‘man’s best friend’.

Discovering a 4,500-year-old olive oil factory in Jordan
26 November 2020

In this blog post, curator Jamie Fraser and scientist Caroline Cartwright run you through the archaeology and science involved in tracking down an ancient olive oil factory, and explain how the process of making modern olive oil would be familiar to people in the past.

Major new archaeology project on site of new museum in Benin
13 November 2020

We are pleased to announce an exciting collaborative archaeology project, developed and delivered as part of the new Edo Museum of West African Art initiative in Benin City, Nigeria.

Buried treasure: top 10 finds
9 July 2020

We mark a milestone of 1.5 million finds recorded by the Portable Antiquities Scheme with a look back at the top 10 treasures from the last 23 years.

An introduction to the Arctic
9 January 2020

You might have a picture in your mind of the Arctic – with its vast icy landscapes and plentiful wildlife – but where actually is the Arctic and what cultures live there? Amber Lincoln, curator of the forthcoming Citi exhibition Arctic: culture and climate, reveals what life is like in the most northerly place in the world. 

 

What does our rubbish say about us?
19 December 2019

Co-curators Julia Farley and Kayte McSweeney explore how rubbish has enabled archaeologists to better understand the lives of people living in ancient Britain, and consider what our own rubbish will say about us.

Eighty years (and more) of Sutton Hoo
24 July 2019

It’s been 80 years since Sutton Hoo was discovered and excavated. But why is this Anglo-Saxon ship burial so important and what has it taught us?

The search for the lost city of Troy
18 June 2019

The myth of the Trojan War has captivated people for thousands of years and has led pilgrims, explorers and archaeologists to search for the location where the famed conflict took place. But did the city really exist? In anticipation of our major autumn exhibition, curators Lesley Fitton and Alexandra Villing explore the reality behind the myth.

Sparking the imagination: the rediscovery of Assyria’s great lost city
1 February 2019

With its exquisite palaces, vast libraries and lush gardens, Nineveh was one of the most important cities of the ancient world. Carine Harmand explores the 19th-century quest to locate and unearth the great lost city…

A library fit for a king
25 October 2018

Ashurbanipal’s Library is one of the most important archaeological discoveries ever made. But what actually is it? Jonathan Taylor, Middle East Curator and expert on the Library of Ashurbanipal, takes a closer look…

British Museum’s Iraq Scheme helps reunite objects from ancient site of Tello
10 August 2018

A group of eight historic objects from Tello seized in a Metropolitan Police raid are now going back to Iraq with the help of the British Museum.

The world’s oldest bridge is being preserved in Iraq
4 April 2018

The world’s oldest bridge, located in the south of Iraq, is soon to be to be saved for future generations thanks to the Museum’s pioneering emergency heritage management project.

World’s earliest figural tattoos discovered on 5,000-year-old mummies
1 March 2018

New research has revealed the world’s earliest figural tattoos on two natural mummies in the British Museum, including the oldest known example of female tattooing.

Major new partnership with the University of Reading
13 December 2017

We are delighted to announce a major partnership project with the University of Reading to develop a significant new collection storage and research facility.

Mummies and log houses of the dead: Scythian life and death
2 December 2017

Bioarchaeologist Eileen Murphy explains how examining the human remains from burials can help us to understand more about the Scythians.

The Iraq Emergency Heritage Management Training Scheme: an update
24 November 2017

The Museum’s Iraq Emergency Heritage Management Training Scheme began in 2015 to help combat the many threats to the country’s archaeology. Now, learn about some of the project’s important new discoveries.

Darius, Herodotus and the Scythians
27 October 2017

Historian and author Tom Holland explains why the Museum’s latest exhibition is a revelation, bringing the Scythians alive from the pages of Herodotus.

Scythians, ice mummies and burial mounds
23 August 2017

Curator St John Simpson takes a closer look at Scythian burial mounds and how they reveal what these nomadic warriors believed about the afterlife.

Dirty old river: secrets of the Thames
31 May 2017

London’s history has always been closely connected to the River Thames, one of the UK’s longest and deepest rivers. On London History Day, Jennifer Wexler, Digital Research Project Producer, dredges up some of the fascinating objects found in this famous river.

What do nomads leave behind?
30 May 2017

Curator of the BP exhibition Scythians: ancient warriors of Siberia St John Simpson takes a closer look at some of the intriguing objects in the show – beautiful and exquisite, unusual and unexpected, but above all light and portable…

Step back in time
4 April 2017

When archaeologists found what looked like a collection of footprints on a beach at Happisburgh (pronounced Haze-borough) in Norfolk, they were unaware they’d discovered tracks of early humans that were a million years old.

The Iraqi archaeologists saving their heritage
3 March 2017

For several years, the destruction of heritage sites in Iraq and Syria by Daesh (so-called Islamic State)* has filled the news. In response, the British Museum has been training Iraqi archaeologists in emergency heritage management.

Conservation and Observation: more on a copper alloy cauldron from Ur
20 February 2017

Hazel Gardiner is working on the Ur digitisation project, continuing the work started in the 1920s and 1930s by archaeologist C. Leonard Woolley. In this blog Hazel Gardiner describes using X-radiography and analysis to unearth the mysteries of a third millennium BC copper-alloy cauldron.

Uncovering a colourful past
9 January 2017

The hidden colours of an ancient Egyptian coffin are revealed through a combination of analysis and non-invasive multispectral imaging techniques. Here Joanne Dyer and Nicola Newman shed light on the process.

Corroded ruin or hidden treasure?
3 March 2016

Hazel Gardiner is working on the Ur digitisation project, continuing the work started in the 1920s and 1930s by archaeologist C. Leonard Woolley.  In this blog Hazel describes one of her current tasks, working on the metal objects and in particular a third millenium copper-alloy cauldron.