Depicting the dead: ancient Egyptian mummy portraits
27 October 2020

Senior scientist Caroline Cartwright explores how these fascinating objects were made, and what they can tell us about the people they portray.

Historical city travel guide: Kulubnarti, Sudan, late 12th century
23 July 2020

Journey back nearly 1,000 years and travel up the Nile to explore the medieval Nubian city of Kulubnarti – now in the north of modern-day Sudan.

Historical city travel guide: Thebes, Egypt, 13th century BC
12 June 2020

Travel back to the 13th century BC and to Thebes – one of ancient Egypt’s most important cities. Ramesses II is reigning pharaoh and Thebes is a bustling city with impressive monuments, flourishing trade, delicious food and lively festivals.

Ancient Egyptian coffins and mystery of ‘black goo’
20 May 2020

Several ancient Egyptian coffins and mummy cases have been found covered in a mysterious ‘black goo’. Dr Kate Fulcher, Research Assistant in the Museum’s Department of Scientific Research, explores what is this goo is made from, why it may have been used and what it can reveal about Egyptian funerary practice.

100 years of science and conservation: recent conservation highlights
5 May 2020

From Michelangelo to mirror caskets, our conservators continue the centenary celebrations for the Departments of Collection Care and Scientific Research by sharing the projects they’re working on.

100 years of science and conservation
12 February 2020

To kick off the centenary year of the Departments of Scientific Research and Collection Care, we look back on some of the Museum’s most exciting scientific discoveries of recent times.

Love around the world
14 February 2019

Love is everywhere on Valentine’s Day and the Museum is no exception. Join us on a tour of love stories from across the globe.

Who was Ashurbanipal?
19 June 2018

Warrior. Scholar. Empire builder. King slayer. Lion hunter. Librarian. Take a closer look at the great Assyrian king Ashurbanipal.

World’s earliest figural tattoos discovered on 5,000-year-old mummies
1 March 2018

New research has revealed the world’s earliest figural tattoos on two natural mummies in the British Museum, including the oldest known example of female tattooing.

Connecting local communities with 4,000 years of heritage in Egypt
21 December 2017

Curator Ilona Regulski reveals how a British Museum research project is using new ways to connect people in Egypt with their incredible past.

What Black History Month means to me
9 October 2017

Playwright, producer and director Patricia Cumper is also a British Museum Trustee. Here, she looks at what Black History Month has meant to her, and how the British Museum can help to tell these stories to the world.

Collecting modern Egypt
19 July 2017

The Museum’s objects from Egypt span from prehistory to the present. In 2016 the modern Egypt project was launched to bring the collection into the 21st century. Objects from housewares and everyday items to ephemera and photographs can tell stories about historical, economic and cultural developments in Egypt over the past century.

Inheriting the most iconic object at the British Museum
15 July 2017

Ilona Regulski is Curator of Egyptian Written Culture at the British Museum. This includes looking after one of the most iconic objects in the world! Here, she shares what she has learnt since becoming the latest custodian of the Rosetta Stone.

Everything you ever wanted to know about the Rosetta Stone
14 July 2017

You’ve probably heard of the Rosetta Stone. It’s one of the most famous objects in the British Museum, but what actually is it? Take a closer look…

Copts of the Nile: the Coptic community in Egypt today
4 January 2016

The exhibition Egypt: faith after the pharaohs, examines religious identity in the first millennium AD, when Egypt became first a majority Christian population and later, Muslim. Today, Egyptian Christians, or Copts, are a significant minority. The extraordinary collections of the British Museum allow us to explore religious identities in Egypt up to the present, here through contemporary photography.

New evidence of human cancer found at ancient Amara West
17 March 2014

Cancer is one of the world’s most common causes of death today, but there is little evidence from before industrialisation: almost nothing is known about the history of the disease in the past. Michaela Binder and Neal Spencer discuss illuminating new evidence of early human cancer.

Amara West 2012: the first glimpses of ancient living conditions and health
13 December 2012

Researcher Michaela Binder reflects on four months of analysis on skeletons from the ancient Egyptian town of Amara West, and what this new research can tell us about how they lived.

The art (and science) of a colourful, cross-culturally dressing statue
2 November 2012

Following our post last week about a cross-cultural statue of Horus, British Museum scientist, Joanne Dyer explains how we know what he once looked like.