Inside ‘The Dig’: how the star-studded film squares with reality of Sutton Hoo
28 January 2021

Netflix’s new film The Dig explores the extraordinary discovery of Sutton Hoo – an early 7th century AD ship burial found on the eve of the Second World War. Curator Sue Brunning looks at how the silver screen portrayal compares to the momentous historical excavation.

Troy: behind the scenes of a Hollywood epic
17 December 2019

The myth of Troy has been told and retold throughout history and Hollywood hasn’t been immune to its lure. Here Honorary Research Fellow Lesley Fitton reveals her behind-the-scenes experience of working on the 2004 epic, Troy.

Connecting local communities with 4,000 years of heritage in Egypt
21 December 2017

Curator Ilona Regulski reveals how a British Museum research project is using new ways to connect people in Egypt with their incredible past.

Hokusai in Ultra HD: Great Wave, big screen
2 June 2017

A new film, the first documentary in English on Hokusai, brings the works of Japan’s greatest artist to the big screen across the UK and Ireland on Sunday 4 June. Director Patricia Wheatley discusses Hokusai’s lasting influence, and how 8K technology has provided greater insight into his immortal skill.

Three printmaking techniques
5 May 2017

What is a print? How do artists create multiple versions of their works? What does lithography actually mean? Well, wonder no more as we take you through three techniques of getting print onto paper!

In search of a lost city… and a lost explorer
24 March 2017

Inspiration for Indiana Jones? No, not our curator Jago Cooper, but Colonel Percy Fawcett, whose incredible true story is now told through a new film, The Lost City of Z. Curators Jago Cooper and Kate Jarvis take a look at some of the objects associated with his expeditions to the Amazon.

The oldest portrait in the British Museum
6 February 2017

The Jericho Skull is arguably the oldest portrait in the British Museum – a human skull from the ancient city of Jericho which had plaster applied to it to form a type of early facial reconstruction. The Jericho Skull is fascinating to look at, but since being discovered in 1953, archaeologists weren’t able to find out much more about this man – until now.