Discovering a 4,500-year-old olive oil factory in Jordan
26 November 2020

In this blog post, curator Jamie Fraser and scientist Caroline Cartwright run you through the archaeology and science involved in tracking down an ancient olive oil factory, and explain how the process of making modern olive oil would be familiar to people in the past.

Before it disappears: recording endangered practices, skills and knowledge
10 November 2020

As technology advances and the world embraces change, centuries-old skills, practices and traditions can be pushed aside – sometimes disappearing altogether. Find out how skills and practices that are in danger of being lost are being preserved by the Museum and EMKP – the Endangered Material Knowledge Programme.

100 years of science and conservation
12 February 2020

To kick off the centenary year of the Departments of Scientific Research and Collection Care, we look back on some of the Museum’s most exciting scientific discoveries of recent times.

What does our rubbish say about us?
19 December 2019

Co-curators Julia Farley and Kayte McSweeney explore how rubbish has enabled archaeologists to better understand the lives of people living in ancient Britain, and consider what our own rubbish will say about us.

Reimagining a Tahitian mourning costume
31 May 2019

In 2018, conservators, curators and scientists had the challenge of preparing an imposing Tahitian mourning costume for display and long-term preservation. Head of Organic Conservation Monique Pullan talks you through the lengthy process

Seeing stars: astrolabes and the Islamic world
29 January 2018

Curator William Greenwood takes a fresh look at some of the scientific instruments that will feature in the new Albukhary Foundation Galleries of the Islamic world, opening in October 2018.

Major new partnership with the University of Reading
13 December 2017

We are delighted to announce a major partnership project with the University of Reading to develop a significant new collection storage and research facility.

Under the microscope: the Oxus treasure and Scythian gold
20 November 2017

Scientist Aude Mongiatti explains her process of investigation and discovery comparing the craftsmanship of the Oxus treasure with the style and techniques of Scythian gold.

Ancient wisdom: what tooth decay can tell us about the past
22 September 2017

Find out what a dental anthropologist does all day, and how tooth decay can lead to exciting new discoveries.

Ladies aglow: finding the colour in 2,000-year-old figurines
1 September 2017

British Museum Scientist Joanne Dyer talks about the new scientific techniques that are casting ancient objects in a new light.

Dirty old river: secrets of the Thames
31 May 2017

London’s history has always been closely connected to the River Thames, one of the UK’s longest and deepest rivers. On London History Day, Jennifer Wexler, Digital Research Project Producer, dredges up some of the fascinating objects found in this famous river.

The Frome Hoard voted top Treasure
21 May 2017

As the Frome Hoard is voted the nation’s top Treasure find of the last 20 years by Telegraph readers, Sam Moorhead, Finds Adviser for the Portable Antiquities Scheme, takes a look back at this remarkable discovery and how its legacy continues today.

The Iraqi archaeologists saving their heritage
3 March 2017

For several years, the destruction of heritage sites in Iraq and Syria by Daesh (so-called Islamic State)* has filled the news. In response, the British Museum has been training Iraqi archaeologists in emergency heritage management.

Conservation and Observation: more on a copper alloy cauldron from Ur
20 February 2017

Hazel Gardiner is working on the Ur digitisation project, continuing the work started in the 1920s and 1930s by archaeologist C. Leonard Woolley. In this blog Hazel Gardiner describes using X-radiography and analysis to unearth the mysteries of a third millennium BC copper-alloy cauldron.

A medieval alchemical book reveals new secrets
5 February 2016

Bink Hallum and Marcel Marée discuss hieroglyphic texts on display in the Egypt: faith after the pharaohs exhibition and in particular the 18th-century copy of the Book of the Seven Climes.

How do you put on a torc?
29 January 2016

Curator Julia Farley explores the fashion world of 2,000 years ago and answers that eternal question: how should you wear a torc? 

New evidence of human cancer found at ancient Amara West
17 March 2014

Cancer is one of the world’s most common causes of death today, but there is little evidence from before industrialisation: almost nothing is known about the history of the disease in the past. Michaela Binder and Neal Spencer discuss illuminating new evidence of early human cancer.

Amara West 2012: the first glimpses of ancient living conditions and health
13 December 2012

Researcher Michaela Binder reflects on four months of analysis on skeletons from the ancient Egyptian town of Amara West, and what this new research can tell us about how they lived.

Murder and mayhem in Predynastic Egypt
6 December 2012

Using some of the latest imaging technology we now know that about 5500 years ago (about 3500 BC) the natural mummy known as Gebelein Man was stabbed in the back.

The art (and science) of a colourful, cross-culturally dressing statue
2 November 2012

Following our post last week about a cross-cultural statue of Horus, British Museum scientist, Joanne Dyer explains how we know what he once looked like.